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SPCL 7922 Multicultural Counseling & Consultation in Schools: Session 5 - Module 5: Racism, Racial Microaggressions, & White Privilege

Open Educational Resource (OER) created for Professor Elizalde-Utnick's SPCL 7922 course.

TASK LIST TO PREPARE FOR ZOOM SESSION

Please complete the following PRIOR to our Zoom session on October 4:

1. Readings/Video

READ the assigned articles (linked below)

Sue

Collins

VIEW 13th Amendment Documentary

2. Journal #4

Go to Blackboard to the Journal link and post to the 'Anti-Black Racism' journal.

3. Prepare for Blackboard Quiz (RAT#5)

The 5-question multiple-choice quiz will be on the assigned readings and video.

4. Take RAT#5 on Blackboard

This RAT will be made available to you on Blackboard at your quiz time (1:00/4:30 pm) on October 4.

5. Join Zoom session at your designated time (1:30/5:00)

VIDEO: 13TH AMENDMENT DOCUMENTARY

SUMMARY

In this session we explore racism and white privilege. We discuss the impact of color blindness on systemic racism and explore the process that marginalized individuals go through when they experience microaggressions.

SESSION SLIDES

ANTI-ASIAN DISCRIMINATION IN THE U.S.

Read the following guide to learn about the history of anti-Asian discrimination in the United States:

https://www.williamjames.edu/academics/centers-of-excellence/multicultural-and-global-mental-health/upload/English-Parent-Guide.pdf

This guide is available in a number of Asian languages. Go to the following website to find it in another language:

https://www.williamjames.edu/academics/centers-of-excellence/multicultural-and-global-mental-health/guide-for-parents-of-asian-american-adolescents.cfm

SUPPLEMENTAL VIDEOS

APPLICATION ACTIVITY: WHITE PRIVILEGE & COLOR BLINDNESS

Activity: Watch videos from the Whiteness Project:

http://www.whitenessproject.org/millennials

1. Begin with Connor’s video. After you watch, reflect on the following questions: 

  • What privileges does Connor talk about having because of his whiteness? 
  • If Connor was a person of color, how might his life be different? How might people perceive him? 
  • Why is Connor just now realizing how lucky he is to have a relatively spotless record? What does this tell us about the importance of talking about whiteness among ourselves and with students? What might happen as a result?

2. Next, watch the videos featuring Sarah, Leilani and Makenna. After you watch, reflect on the following questions:

  • What themes of “colorblindness” come up in each of the videos? 
  • Do you or colleagues you know espouse this view that colorblindness contributes to racial harmony in the classroom? 
  • How might this colorblindness isolate or hurt students of color? 
  • How is colorblindness a form of white privilege? How does it further instill the “power of normal”? 

3.  Finally, reflect on this overarching question: How can talking about whiteness help deconstruct “the power of normal” discussed in “What is White Privilege, Really?” If the people in these videos had discussed their whiteness from a young age, consider how their responses might have changed.  

4. Take a moment to reflect. Free write for a few minutes about your own experience with whiteness and white privilege, and how that can inform the ways educators can handle topics of race in the classroom.