Skip to main content
Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

ART 3169/Grad ARTD 7165 Global Contemporary Art: From 1945 to the Present: Course Documents

Alternative textbook for Mona Hadler's course

Syllabus: 3169

Professor Mona Hadler mhadler@brooklyn.cuny.edu

ARTD   3169    Global Contemporary Art 

This course has an OER website with readings and images:

https://libguides.brooklyn.cuny.edu/globalcontemporaryart/home

the password for images and readings is   hadler

We will however not follow the OER exactly.  I will send extra pdfs and powerpoints of the images from class

This course is synchronous on zoom.   Every week I will send you a zoom invite and you will attend the same as if it was held at the campus.  Attendance will be taken and class participation is critical—through conversation and the chat function.  The lectures will not be taped so you must attend class during weekly class hours.

  

3 credits; 45 hours

This course will examine the development of contemporary art internationally from the Post War Era to the present excluding the United States. It will consider the historical and contemporary contexts of the countries and artists discussed as well as theoretical issues of globalism, diaspora, and hybridity. While it would be impossible to cover all of global contemporary art in a course such as this, case studies involving different artists and regions will afford the opportunity to seriously investigate different artistic movements and cultures and address global and diasporic issues. Attention will be paid to artists exhibiting in museums and galleries current with the course. We will differentiate between modern (postwar) and contemporary art and issues. We will review salient aspects of the history of the county including issues of colonialism and independence.

 The course will be divided into the following units: Postwar Europe, Britain, and Eastern Europe 1945-89 ; Asia (East—China, Japan. Korea): the Middle East and South Asia (India and Pakistan); Africa, and  Latin America

The grading of the course will be divided between a midterm, a paper, and a final

More than 3 absences will drop your grade.

Writing Assignment

Due to covid traveling is unsafe so I will not ask you to go to a museum.  I will send you an assignment that uses the MOMA website  moma.org

Extra credit-   attend the lecture by Samantha Noel

   Brooklyn College BA 2001, PhD Duke University , Professor Wayne State University

“Tropical Aesthetics of Black Modernism”

February 9th, at 12:30 via Zoom   

Send me one paragraph as to what you learned or found interesting

Plagiarism and Cheating:

CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

“Academic Dishonesty is prohibited in the City University of New York and is punishable by penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion, as provided herein.”

-- CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

Brooklyn College requires all faculty members to report any incidents of academic dishonesty. Furthermore, I take academic integrity extremely seriously and do not tolerate any violations. Ignorance of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism is not an excuse.  Please go to http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/policies/ for further information.  If you still have questions, please discuss them with me. Any violation will result in automatic reporting to the school and a failing grade on the assignment in question; in certain cases where the violation warrants, the student may fail the class and disciplinary proceedings may begin.

The midterm and final will be open book---you can use your class notes but cannot cut and paste from the internet—the ideas must come from class and your own thoughts on the art and its context and be written in your own words    Cutting from the internet is plagiarism.

Course outline

Introduction: Case studies

Unit 1 Post War Britain, Europe and Eastern Europe 1945-1989

Britain: Black Britain, The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies, Stuart Hall, Frank Bowling and abstraction , Black British filmmakers  Diaspora and the Black Atlantic

London: monument to the political prisoner

Pop Art and Consumerism in Europe, Hamilton, Evelyn Axel, Erro

 Germany: Joseph Beuys and Fluxus, Gerhardt Richter and Capitalist Realism, Sigmar Polke,  Anselm Kiefer and Neo Expressionism, Schlingenschlief,

Eastern Europe:  Post 1989 and Soviet Non Conformists: Victor Pivovarov, Anri Sala, Ostalgia

Readings:

Sarah Wilson Introduction to Paris Post War, optional

Enwezor, “The Judgement of Art: Postwar and Artistic Worldliness”

Lentini, Cosmopolitan Contaminations

*Robert Burstow, on Monument to the Unknown Political Prisoner article—optional

Kevin Ryan The_Art_of_Democracy_Constitutive_Power_and_the_Limits_of_Dissensus , Sept 2014  on Schlingenschlief pdf will be sent to you

Stuart Hall, Cultural Memory and Diaspora, pdf sent to you

Dorothy Rowe,  “Non Synchronous Cartographies: Frank Bowling’s Map Paintings,” Small Axe, July 2013  pdf sent to you

Kobena Mercer, "Frank Bowling's Map Paintings," in Gilane Tawadros and Sarah Campbell, eds., Fault Lines: Contemporary African Art and Shifting Landscapes (London: InIVA, 2003), 139-150

Barson, Modernism and the Black Atlantic  pdf sent to you

Unit 2 East Asia—China, Japan and Korea---

Postwar Japan: Noguchi, Tanaka, Tetzuka, Gutai, Lee Ufan (Korean Artist in Japan), Gutai

Korea: Post War Korea, Tansaekhwa –monochrome painting, 

Contemporary Korean Art: Do Ho Su and others

China: Art and Politics of the Cultural Revolution, global Maoism

Contemporary Art: Ai Weiwei and current political events—Cao Guo-Qiang

Contemporary Japan: Hito Steryl

Readings:

*Julia Andrews, Painters and Politics in the People’s Republic of China 1949-1979, Berkeley 1994  optional

*Chang-Tai Hung, Oil Paintings and Politics: Weaving a Heroic Tale of the Chinese Communist Revolution,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 49, No. 4 (Oct., 2007): 783-814   optional

Aruna D’Souza, “Early intersections: the work of third world feminism,” in We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85,

Alexandra Munroe, All the Landscapes: Gutai’s World (Gutai Splendid Playground)

Joan Kee, Contemporary Korean Art, Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method into and chapter 5   pdf sent to you

Unit 3 Middle East and South Asia (India and Pakistan)—Iran, Turkey, Israel, Lebanon, Pakistan and India. Artists include Iranians: Shirarzeh Houshiary, Shirin Neshat; Pakistan:  Shahzia Sikander,  Lebanese: Walid Raad, Mona Hatoum,   Israelis: Michal Rovner, Guy Ben-Ner, Omer Fast

Readings:

Fereshteh Daftari, catalogue essay in Museum of Modern Art Exhibition, Without Boundary

Fereshteh Daftari, catalogue essay in Iran Modern

Fereshteh Daftari—sections from her new book Persia Reframed, 2020

*Iftikhar Dadi, Art in Pakistan: The First Decades in Hanging Fire Contemporary Art from Pakistan, Salima Hashmi ed., Asia Society, 2009  optional

Fereshteh Daftari, “Beyond Islamic Roots, Beyond Modernism,” 2003

Said Orientalism chapter 1

Lambert Beatty, (on Walid Raad) Make Believe, Parafiction and Plausibility, pdf will be sent to you

Homi Bhaba, On Mimicry    pdf sent to you

Geeta Kapur, Globalization and Culture, 2008

Unit 4 Africa Different artists and regions will be covered from Independence to contemporary times. Artists will include Chris Ofili, Yinka Shonibari, El Anatsui.  Questions of diaspora, the Black Atlantic, third world politics and tourism will be addressed.. Negritude vs. the Black Atlantic

Readings

Introduction to Elizabeth Harney, In Senghor’s Shadow: Art Politics and the Avant Garde in Senegal, 1960-1995, 2004

*Sections from: Okwei Enwezor and Chika Okele-Agulu, Contemporary African Art Since 1980, 2009  optional

*Enwezor, in The Short Century  optional

*Sidney Littlefield Kasfir, African Art and the Colonial Encounter, 309-15 optional

Kasfir, “African Art and Authenticity, A Text with a Shadow.” Pdf will be sent to you

Olu Oquibe, “Heart of Darkness” 1992

*Tourist production ideas  “My Father’s Business,” in Unpacking Culture optional

Niru Ratnam, “Ofili and the Limits of Hybridity”

“The Sixties in Bamako: Malick Sidibé and James Brown” by Manthia Diawara

Sections from Fanon

Unit 5 Latin America: From Kahlo, to Tropicalia and to Santiago Sierra, Francis Alys, Doris Salcedo and Alfredo Jaar. Questions of the carnivalesque and anthropophagy, concretism and the participatory works of Lygia Clark and Oiticica

Readings

Robert Stam on Carmen Miranda

*Anna Dezeuze Dematerialization on Oiticica’s Paragolas optional

“Oswald de Andrade’s Cannibalist Manifesto”  pdf will be mailed to you

Mari Carmen Ramirez, “Inversions the School of the South,” pdf sent to you

Essays from the Lygia Clark catalogue, Met Breuer, 2019

Syllabus: 7165 G (Graduate)

Professor Mona Hadler mhadler@brooklyn.cuny.edu

grad Global Contemporary Art Art 7165G

This course has an OER website with readings and images:

https://libguides.brooklyn.cuny.edu/globalcontemporaryart/home

the password for images and readings is   hadler

We will however not follow the OER exactly.  I will send extra pdfs and powerpoints of the images from class

This course is synchronous on zoom.   Every week I will send you a zoom invite and you will attend the same as if it was held at the campus.  Attendance will be taken and class participation is critical—through conversation and the chat function.  The lectures will not be taped so you must attend class during weekly class hours.

  

3 credits; 45 hours

This course will examine the development of contemporary art internationally from the Post War Era to the present excluding the United States. It will consider the historical and contemporary contexts of the countries and artists discussed as well as theoretical issues of globalism, diaspora, and hybridity. While it would be impossible to cover all of global contemporary art in a course such as this, case studies involving different artists and regions will afford the opportunity to seriously investigate different artistic movements and cultures and address global and diasporic issues. Attention will be paid to artists exhibiting in museums and galleries current with the course. We will differentiate between modern (postwar) and contemporary art and issues. We will review salient aspects of the history of the county including issues of colonialism and independence.

 The course will be divided into the following units: Postwar Europe, Britain, and Eastern Europe 1945-89 ; Asia (East—China, Japan. Korea): the Middle East and South Asia (India and Pakistan); Africa, and  Latin America

The grading of the course will be divided between a midterm, a paper, and a final

More than 3 absences will drop your grade.

Writing Assignment

Graduate students will write a 15 page research paper with footnotes and bib on a topic relevant to this course and to your studio practice.  Please work with me on the topic.  You will first send me a one page thesis statement to approve

Extra credit-   attend the lecture by Samantha Noel

   Brooklyn College BA 2001, PhD Duke University , Professor Wayne State University

“Tropical Aesthetics of Black Modernism”

February 9th, at 12:30 via Zoom   

Send me one paragraph as to what you learned or found interesting

Plagiarism and Cheating:

CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

“Academic Dishonesty is prohibited in the City University of New York and is punishable by penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion, as provided herein.”

-- CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

Brooklyn College requires all faculty members to report any incidents of academic dishonesty. Furthermore, I take academic integrity extremely seriously and do not tolerate any violations. Ignorance of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism is not an excuse.  Please go to http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/policies/ for further information.  If you still have questions, please discuss them with me. Any violation will result in automatic reporting to the school and a failing grade on the assignment in question; in certain cases where the violation warrants, the student may fail the class and disciplinary proceedings may begin.

The midterm and final will be open book---you can use your class notes but cannot cut and paste from the internet—the ideas must come from class and your own thoughts on the art and its context and be written in your own words    Cutting from the internet is plagiarism.

Course outline

Introduction: Case studies

Unit 1 Post War Britain, Europe and Eastern Europe 1945-1989

Britain: Black Britain, The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies, Stuart Hall, Frank Bowling and abstraction , Black British filmmakers  Diaspora and the Black Atlantic

London: monument to the political prisoner

Pop Art and Consumerism in Europe, Hamilton, Evelyn Axel, Erro

 Germany: Joseph Beuys and Fluxus, Gerhardt Richter and Capitalist Realism, Sigmar Polke,  Anselm Kiefer and Neo Expressionism, Schlingenschlief,

Eastern Europe:  Post 1989 and Soviet Non Conformists: Victor Pivovarov, Anri Sala, Ostalgia

Readings:

Sarah Wilson Introduction to Paris Post War, optional

Enwezor, “The Judgement of Art: Postwar and Artistic Worldliness”

Lentini, Cosmopolitan Contaminations

*Robert Burstow, on Monument to the Unknown Political Prisoner article—optional

Kevin Ryan The_Art_of_Democracy_Constitutive_Power_and_the_Limits_of_Dissensus , Sept 2014  on Schlingenschlief pdf will be sent to you

Stuart Hall, Cultural Memory and Diaspora, pdf sent to you

Dorothy Rowe,  “Non Synchronous Cartographies: Frank Bowling’s Map Paintings,” Small Axe, July 2013  pdf sent to you

Kobena Mercer, "Frank Bowling's Map Paintings," in Gilane Tawadros and Sarah Campbell, eds., Fault Lines: Contemporary African Art and Shifting Landscapes (London: InIVA, 2003), 139-150

Barson, Modernism and the Black Atlantic  pdf sent to you

Unit 2 East Asia—China, Japan and Korea---

Postwar Japan: Noguchi, Tanaka, Tetzuka, Gutai, Lee Ufan (Korean Artist in Japan), Gutai

Korea: Post War Korea, Tansaekhwa –monochrome painting, 

Contemporary Korean Art: Do Ho Su and others

China: Art and Politics of the Cultural Revolution, global Maoism

Contemporary Art: Ai Weiwei and current political events—Cao Guo-Qiang

Contemporary Japan: Hito Steryl

Readings:

*Julia Andrews, Painters and Politics in the People’s Republic of China 1949-1979, Berkeley 1994  optional

*Chang-Tai Hung, Oil Paintings and Politics: Weaving a Heroic Tale of the Chinese Communist Revolution,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 49, No. 4 (Oct., 2007): 783-814   optional

Aruna D’Souza, “Early intersections: the work of third world feminism,” in We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85,

Alexandra Munroe, All the Landscapes: Gutai’s World (Gutai Splendid Playground)

Joan Kee, Contemporary Korean Art, Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method into and chapter 5   pdf sent to you

Unit 3 Middle East and South Asia (India and Pakistan)—Iran, Turkey, Israel, Lebanon, Pakistan and India. Artists include Iranians: Shirarzeh Houshiary, Shirin Neshat; Pakistan:  Shahzia Sikander,  Lebanese: Walid Raad, Mona Hatoum,   Israelis: Michal Rovner, Guy Ben-Ner, Omer Fast

Readings:

Fereshteh Daftari, catalogue essay in Museum of Modern Art Exhibition, Without Boundary

Fereshteh Daftari, catalogue essay in Iran Modern

Fereshteh Daftari—sections from her new book Persia Reframed, 2020

*Iftikhar Dadi, Art in Pakistan: The First Decades in Hanging Fire Contemporary Art from Pakistan, Salima Hashmi ed., Asia Society, 2009  optional

Fereshteh Daftari, “Beyond Islamic Roots, Beyond Modernism,” 2003

Said Orientalism chapter 1

Lambert Beatty, (on Walid Raad) Make Believe, Parafiction and Plausibility, pdf will be sent to you

Homi Bhaba, On Mimicry    pdf sent to you

Geeta Kapur, Globalization and Culture, 2008

Unit 4 Africa Different artists and regions will be covered from Independence to contemporary times. Artists will include Chris Ofili, Yinka Shonibari, El Anatsui.  Questions of diaspora, the Black Atlantic, third world politics and tourism will be addressed.. Negritude vs. the Black Atlantic

Readings

Introduction to Elizabeth Harney, In Senghor’s Shadow: Art Politics and the Avant Garde in Senegal, 1960-1995, 2004

*Sections from: Okwei Enwezor and Chika Okele-Agulu, Contemporary African Art Since 1980, 2009  optional

*Enwezor, in The Short Century  optional

*Sidney Littlefield Kasfir, African Art and the Colonial Encounter, 309-15 optional

Kasfir, “African Art and Authenticity, A Text with a Shadow.” Pdf will be sent to you

Olu Oquibe, “Heart of Darkness” 1992

*Tourist production ideas  “My Father’s Business,” in Unpacking Culture optional

Niru Ratnam, “Ofili and the Limits of Hybridity”

“The Sixties in Bamako: Malick Sidibé and James Brown” by Manthia Diawara

Sections from Fanon

Unit 5 Latin America: From Kahlo, to Tropicalia and to Santiago Sierra, Francis Alys, Doris Salcedo and Alfredo Jaar. Questions of the carnivalesque and anthropophagy, concretism and the participatory works of Lygia Clark and Oiticica

Readings

Robert Stam on Carmen Miranda

*Anna Dezeuze Dematerialization on Oiticica’s Paragolas optional

“Oswald de Andrade’s Cannibalist Manifesto”  pdf will be mailed to you

Mari Carmen Ramirez, “Inversions the School of the South,” pdf sent to you

Essays from the Lygia Clark catalogue, Met Breuer, 2019