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SPCL 7914: Assignments

Open Educational Resource (OER) created for Professor Elizalde-Utnick's SPCL 7914 course.

Website Activities

Students are expected to engage in a multi-level process of critical self-reflection, an important component in school psychology training. Each session link is filled with resources, and students are expected to preview the class material prior to each session and then review the material after each class. Session slides will be uploaded after each session to allow for a review. The learning process is cumulative, with each session integrating the content from earlier sessions. Students are also expected to complete the reflection activities posted on this website.

This website is intended to optimize the learning process, and the instructors look forward to your feedback.

Bilingual Assessment

Students are required to assess one emergent bilingual student - an English language learner (ELL) student - between the ages of 8 and 16. The ELL selected must be dominant in the language other than English.  The ELL will be evaluated bilingually depending on field of study, as follows:

Bilingual School Psychology:

  • Initial intake to gather background data
  • Language proficiency assessment (English and target language)
  • Bilingual cognitive assessment
  • Bilingual achievement assessment
  • Social-emotional assessment

Bilingual School Counseling:

  • Initial intake to gather background data
  • Language proficiency assessment (English and target language)
  • Social-emotional assessment

Students are encouraged to practice with other ELLs as well. 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY DATA WORKSHEET & ANALYSIS

Students will organize and analyze their language proficiency data using this worksheet. They will receive feedback on their data, which will help with further assessment and report writing.

DUE: March 19

Language Proficiency Assessment Report

The ELL’s proficiency in both the first and second languages will be assessed using a variety of procedures, as described in class and in the readings.  All students must implement informal assessment techniques.  Formal tools can be utilized as well, although they are optional.  The findings will be written up into a report, which consists of:

Student Data: This section should include all the identifying information (e.g., student name, date of birth), date of testing, evaluator’s name, etc.  In addition, it should mention languages spoken at home and languages used during the evaluation.

Reason for Referral: Describe the reason(s) for the referral and the referral source (e.g., parent, teacher).  If the referral reason is related to language development or second language acquisition or acculturation issues, provide a description of the referral problem.

Instruments and Procedures Used: This section includes a list of the informal tools and procedures used to assess the ELL student.

Background Information: This segment of the report should address the background information for both the native language (L1) and the second language (L2), and cultural background and acculturation information. This section should provide answers to such questions as reasons for immigration, present contact with the native culture, and cultural factors that impact behavior and achievement.  This section incorporates the history of development for L1 and L2 and documents possible language delays, and usage of language at home and with different people (i.e., parents, other family members in home, peers, and teachers).  In addition, it should include type of language instruction received and duration. 

Behavioral Observations: This section includes the observations made by the examiner during the assessment and other observations conducted in a variety of settings (e.g., classroom, home, playground) and while the student is interacting with a variety of people (e.g., parents, siblings, peers, teachers). For observations of the child interacting in the classroom, describe the context in which the observation was made (i.e., lesson, individual work, lecture, group activity), the content of the instruction (i.e., topic of instruction, sequence of instruction, presentation style, language(s) used for instruction), and the interactions with teacher(s) and peers. A number of questions can be addressed such as: What is the degree of code switching and under what circumstances does code switching occur? Observations about emotional or behavioral adjustment concerns based on migration or acculturation stress should also be noted in this section.

Assessment Results – Language Proficiency: This section describes the language proficiency assessment results (based on informal/formal tools) of L1 and L2 (and L3, etc.). First paragraph should describe the various areas that were assessed: oral language (receptive language; expressive language; pragmatics) and literacy skills (reading; writing). Overall dominance results are described.

Oral Language (subheader): Describe the student’s oral language (receptive language; expressive language; pragmatics) ability in L1 and L2 (and L3, etc.). Utilize handouts provided to help structure this section.  The examiner needs to answer questions such as, how well developed are the student’s expressive and receptive language skills?  Make a statement about dominance in terms of oral language.  This section should also address in what language(s) the instruction should be provided (i.e., primarily in English or native or both).

Literacy (subheader): Describe the student’s literacy skills (reading and writing) in L1 and L2 (and L3, etc.). Utilize handouts provided to help structure this section.  The examiner needs to answer questions such as, how well developed are the student’s reading and writing skills in each language?  Make a statement about dominance in terms of reading and writing.  This section should also address in what language(s) the instruction should be provided (i.e., primarily in English or native or both).

Summary and Recommendations: This preliminary report should conclude with a summary discussion of the language proficiency results.  There should be a discussion concerning the implications for the rest of the evaluation process (i.e., the psychoeducational battery).

Students must submit all raw data with the report (i.e., protocols, informal assessment data, etc.), along with the appropriate rubric.

DUE: APRIL 23
 

Class Participation Self-Assessment

Twice during the semester students are evaluated on their level of class participation using the Class Participation Rubric. The process is two-fold: 1) students conduct a self-assessment of their active participation in class; 2) the instructor evaluates class participation using the attached rubric.

Students are required to critically reflect on their participation in small- and large-group discussions by completing a midterm and final self-assessment; students will submit the completed rubric for evaluation by the instructor. The purpose of the self-assessment is to foster and honest critical self-reflection and to enhance the quality of participation. If the student’s and instructor’s assessments do not coincide, then they will meet to discuss it further. Ultimately, it is the instructor’s evaluation that is used for grade purposes; but the self-assessment is an integral component that potentially maximizes the level of participation and performance outcomes.

Midterm Self Assessment DUE: March 12

Final Self-Assessment DUE: May 14

Midterm Peer Evaluation (non-graded)

Each individual will evaluate the contributions of all the other team members by completing the quantitative and qualitative portions of the midterm peer evaluation form located at the end of the syllabus (form also available here). This form will be collected on the day of the midterm exam. The results will be disseminated anonymously to all team members by your instructors. The purpose of this evaluation is to give feedback to each team member to maximize team accountability.

DUE: MARCH 12

Quizzes

There are eight (individual and team) quizzes (RATs) on the assigned readings. These quizzes consist of five multiple-choice questions and take 5-10 minutes for the individual administration, and approximately another 5 minutes for the team administration. These administrations will occur at the beginning of each assigned class. There will be no make-up quizzes. If a student arrives late to class, the score on that day’s iRAT quiz will be zero. The two lowest iRAT scores will be dropped.

Assessment Battery Report

Each student will use at least one new instrument and incorporate it into a psychoeducational assessment of the same individual evaluated above.  Each student must discuss the instruments and procedures with the professor. This assignment (specifically, the results section) will vary depending on the field of study (bilingual school psychology vs. bilingual school counseling) and target language. Informal assessment procedures must be implemented. The written report must include the following:

Student Data: This section should include all the identifying information (e.g., student name, date of birth), date of testing, evaluator’s name, etc.  In addition, it should mention languages spoken at home and languages used during the evaluation.

Reason for Referral: Describe the reason(s) for the referral and the referral source (e.g., parent, teacher).  If the referral reason is related to language development or second language acquisition or acculturation issues, provide a description of the referral problem.

Background Information: This segment of the report should address the background information for both the native language (L1) and the second language (L2), and cultural background and acculturation information. This section should provide answers to such questions as reasons for immigration, present contact with the native culture, and cultural factors that impact behavior and achievement.  This section incorporates the history of development for L1 and L2 and documents possible language delays, and usage of language at home and with different people (i.e., parents, other family members in home, peers, and teachers). In addition, it should include type of language instruction received and duration. 

Instruments and Procedures Used: This section includes a list of all formal, as well as informal tools and procedures used to assess ELL students. Included in this section is a description of any modifications of test procedures (i.e., testing of limits) or adaptations of test instruments (i.e., changes in task or content to reflect linguistically or culturally appropriate stimuli).

Behavioral Observations: This section includes the observations made by the examiner during the assessment and other observations conducted in a variety of settings (e.g., classroom, home, playground) and while the student is interacting with a variety of people (e.g., parents, siblings, peers, teachers). For observations of the child interacting in the classroom, describe the context in which the observation was made (i.e., lesson, individual work, lecture, group activity), the content of the instruction (i.e., topic of instruction, sequence of instruction, presentation style, language(s) used for instruction), and the interactions with teacher(s) and peers. A number of questions can be addressed such as: Does the student exhibit linguistic non-fluencies, revisions, delayed responses, use of nonspecific terms, inappropriate responses, poor topic maintenance, need for repetition?  Are these due to the second language acquisition process, language loss, or a language disorder? What is the degree of code switching and under what circumstances does code switching occur? Observations about emotional or behavioral adjustment concerns based on migration or acculturation stress should also be noted in this section.

Assessment Results: This section differs depending on field of study.

For Bilingual School Psychology: First paragraph should describe the various areas assessed (language proficiency; cognitive functioning; academic functioning; social-emotional functioning). Statements about limitations regarding the procedures with ELLs should be included here. Validity issues are included.

Language Proficiency: This section describes the language proficiency assessment results (based on informal/formal tools) of L1 and L2.  Describe the student’s oral language (receptive language; expressive language; pragmatics) and literacy skills (reading; writing).  Utilize handouts provided to help structure this section.  The examiner needs to answer questions such as, how well developed are the student’s expressive and receptive language skills and the reading and writing skills in each language?  Make a statement about dominance.  This section should also address in what language(s) the instruction should be provided (i.e., primarily in English or native or both).

Cognitive Functioning: Describe overall functioning, as well as domains.  If scores obtained are not valid for the ELL populations or if modifications were made report results qualitatively.

Academic Functioning: Describe overall functioning, as well as domains.  If scores obtained are not valid for the ELL populations or if modifications were made report results qualitatively.

Social & Emotional Functioning: Describe overall functioning, as well as domains.  This should include a discussion of the student’s ethnic/racial identity; the student’s level of acculturation, including the AQS score and acculturation processes; the students experience with bias and any other immigration issues; and the students’ psychosocial experiences in school. Include adaptive behavior functioning, when appropriate. The results should incorporate both interview and BASC results.

Summary and Recommendations: The report should conclude with a summary discussion of the results that reflect relevant cultural and language issues.  Recommendations should target program placements and support services such as bilingual or multicultural counseling, language(s) of instruction, and culturally sensitive instructional, behavioral, and cognitive strategies.  Strategies for differentiated instruction for ELLs should be included.

 

For Bilingual School Counseling:

Assessment Results: First paragraph should describe the various areas assessed (language proficiency; cognitive functioning; academic functioning; social-emotional functioning). Statements about limitations regarding the procedures with ELLs should be included here. Validity issues are included.

Language Proficiency: This section describes the language proficiency assessment results (based on informal/formal tools) of L1 and L2.  Describe the student’s oral language (receptive language; expressive language; pragmatics) and literacy skills (reading; writing).  Utilize handouts provided to help structure this section.  The examiner needs to answer questions such as, how well developed are the student’s expressive and receptive language skills and the reading and writing skills in each language?  Make a statement about dominance.  This section should also address in what language(s) the instruction should be provided (i.e., primarily in English or native or both).

Social & Emotional Functioning: Describe overall functioning, as well as domains.  This should include a discussion of the student’s ethnic/racial identity; the student’s level of acculturation, including the AQS score and acculturation processes; the students experience with bias and any other immigration issues; and the students’ psychosocial experiences in school. Include adaptive behavior functioning, when appropriate. The results should incorporate both interview and BASC results.

Summary and Recommendations: The report should conclude with a summary discussion of the results that reflect relevant cultural and language issues.  Recommendations should target program placements and support services such as bilingual or multicultural counseling, language(s) of instruction, and culturally sensitive instructional, behavioral, and cognitive strategies.  Strategies for differentiated instruction for ELLs should be included.

Please note that the language proficiency assessment report written on this same individual will be incorporated into the comprehensive battery report.  Standardized scores should not be reported, unless the tool was standardized for use with ELLs.  Students must submit all raw data with the report (i.e., protocols, informal assessment data, etc.), along with the appropriate rubric. Format of paper has been modified for the school counseling students (see rubric).

All students must submit a typed, double-spaced paper. Write up your findings, organized according to the rubric. E-mailed submissions will not be acceptedMake sure you attach a copy of the rubric.

DUE: MAY 21

Final Peer Evaluation (graded)

At the end of the term, it is necessary for all members of this class to assess the contributions that each member of the team made to the work of the team.  You will divide 100 points amongst your teammates based on the contributions they made to the team throughout the semester. This contribution should presumably reflect your judgment of such things as: 1) Preparation (Were they prepared when they came to class?); 2) Contribution (Did they contribute productively to group discussion and work?); 3) Respect of others' ideas (Did they encourage others to contribute their ideas?); and 4) Flexibility (Were they flexible when disagreements occurred?). It is important that you raise the evaluation of people who truly worked hard for the good of the group and lower the evaluation of those you perceived not to be working as hard on group tasks. See Final Peer Evaluation Form.

DUE: MAY 14