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ENG 1010: English Composition-Student Version (2018-19 Archive): Weinstein, Jillian

2018-2019 Archive Copy of ENG 1010: English Composition-Student Version

Course Overview, Objectives

Course Description

This class is an introduction to college level composition in expository writing strategies. .  Throughout this course you will not only read and analyze a variety of written texts, but you will also read and analyze multi-media texts (ie. Images, music, short video clips).  You will practice your critical reading skills and apply these skills to your own cirtical writing.  Much of our class time will be spent going through the writing process both independently and in groups for workshopping.  You will use the skills you developed throughout this course, and the texts to complete a final exam at the end of the term.

 

 It is my personal goal to help each of you achieve the level of success necessary to move forward in your schooling. In doing such, it is imperative you put in the necessary work and take advantage of all English 1010 has to offer (ie. the writing skills necessary to pass most of the classes you will take in your schooling career). 

 

This syllabus provides a detailed account of what is expected of you throughout this semster of English 1010.  While the semester has been strategically planned, it is subject to change. 

Course Objectives:

  • Students will be able to critically analyze diverse texts
  • Students will be able to write unified and coherent essays (structure, style, tone, syntax)
  • Students will be able to acitvely participate in writing workshops as well as the discussion of texts

Course Requirements and Policies

Required Texts:

  • Freshman Common Reading: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah
  • All course readings will be available at www.schoology.com with access code GXG98-686QK. It is your duty to either bring a printed version to class, or a device in which you can read the assigned text.
  •  

Course Requirements & Policies :

  • Attendance and Punctuality:
    • If you miss more than four classes, you will receive no credit for participation. Two latenesses count as one absence.  Arriving more than 10  minutes late counts as being late.  A pattern of lateness will affect your grade.

 

  • Participation:
    • Participation includes completing and commentating on the assigned reading, contributing to class discussion through listening and responding to classmates or the instructor, bringing required materials to class, and enagaging in peer review and group activities.
    • NOTE: Cellphones must be silenced and put away during class. The use of cellphones and other electronics is not permitted in the classroom, except under exceptional circumstances. Students should inform the instructor about these circumstances.
  • Reading:
    • Class discussion is a critical element of this course, and participation is essential. Students are expected to have closely read and be ready to discuss all readings on the day they are assigned. There will be unannounced reading quizzes. Bring the assigned reading to every class.
  • Assignments:
    • Essays and Other Writing- Students will write the following: a personal narrative (750-1000 words), two summaries (250-500 words each), an argumentative essay (1000-1250 words), a compare and contrast essay (1000-1250 words).  Students will revise each of these essays. These essays must be typed, double-spaced, in 12-point font, and formatted with one-inch margins. In addition, students will have an in-class essay exam. Students will be asked to complete other assignments, such as journal entries, in-class writing, and reading responses. NOTE: Essays are due at the beginning of class. The instructor will not accept essays submitted via email.
    • Final Exam- English 1010 students must take a final exam. The exam is based on responses to two pieces of writing: one 5-7 page essay, distributed one week before the end of the term, and a second 1-2 page piece, distributed along with the question on the day of the exam. The exam will count for 20% fo the final grade for the class. The instructor will discuss the test format in class.
    • LOOP Workshop- The Brooklyn College Bulletin states the following: All students in English 1010 will complete the required Brooklyn College library orientation, which will introduce them to the services and resources of the library, including access to and ethical use of its print nad electronic resources. 
  • Grading:
    • The Brooklyn College policy on grading for English 1010 is as follows: Grades for English 1010 are A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, NC or F.  Note that the minimum passing grade is C-. Students who have completed all the course work but are not yet writing at the college level will receive a grade of NC; students who have not completed the course work will receive a grade of F. 
    • Students who do not pass English 1010 must repeat it the following semester. The course may not be taken more than three times; students who receive three grades of F, NC, and/or WU may be dismissed from the college.
    • NOTE: Essays turned in late will be penalized half a letter grade for each class meeting they are late. Late work will not be accepted after one week has passed from the original due date.  If students miss a class during which an essay is to be submitted, students are still responsible for sutmitting (emailing) the essay on the same day AND bringing a hard copy of it th enext time they attend class.
    •  

Possible grades are as follows:

 

A

A-

 

93-100

90-92

B+

B

B-

88-89

83-87

80-82

C+

C

C-

78-79

73-77

70-72

D+

D

D-

68-69

63-67

60-62

F

 

 

Below 60

 

 

 

 

Course Breakdown of Grade:

Essays

1. Personal Narrative 10%

2. Summaries: 10%

3. Argumentative Essay 15%

4. Compare and Contrast 15%

5. In class Compare and Contrast: 10%

60%

 

10 Quizzes, and other in class assignments

10%

Attendance and Participation (readings/discussions)

10%

Final Exam

20%

 

 

 

Additional Policy:

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is not tolerated. If you are caught plagiarizing on an assignment, you will fail the assignment, and perhaps even the class.  You may also be subject to disciplinary action by the college. Please read Brooklyn Colleges statement on Plagiarism below. 

 

"The faculty and administration of Brooklyn College support an environment free from cheating and plagiarism. Each student is responsible for being aware of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism and for avoiding both. The complete text of the CUNY Academic Integrity Policy and the Brooklyn College procedure for implementing that policy can be found at this site: http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/policies. If a faculty member suspects a violation of academic integrity and, upon investigation, confirms that violation, or if the student admits the violation, the faculty member MUST report the violation”

 

Students With Disabilities:  In order to receive disability-related academic accommodations students must first be registered with the Center for Student Disability Services. Students who have a documented disability or suspect they may have a disability are invited to set up an appointment with the Director of the Center for Student Disability Services, Ms. Valerie Stewart-Lovell at 718-951-5538. If you have already registered with the Center for Student Disability Services, please provide me with the course accommodation form and discuss your specific accommodation with me.

 

Non-attendance Because of Religious Beliefs: Brooklyn College’s statement on non-attendance because of religious belief is located on page 66 of the Brooklyn College Undergraduate Bulletin: http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/web/off_registrar/2017-2018_Undergraduate_Bulletin.pdf

Student Bereavement Policy: Brooklyn College’s statement on non-attendance because of religious belief is located here: http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/web/about/initiatives/policies/bereavement.php

Important Dates

▪ Monday, August 27 Weekday classes begin

▪ Sunday, September 2 Last day to add a course

▪ Wednesday, September 5 Conversion Day; Classes follow a Monday Schedule, Last day to file for elective course Pass/Fail

▪ Saturday, September 8 Weekend classes begin

▪ Sunday, September 16 Last day to drop a course without a grade.  

▪ Tuesday, November 6 Last day to withdraw from course with a W (non-penalty) grade.  

 

NOTE: English 1010 is an Academic Foundations course.  Brooklyn College’s policy on withdrawing from English 1010 is as follows:

 

Students are not permitted at any time to delete, drop, or withdraw from an assigned Academic Foundations course without obtaining permission of the academic department involved and consulting the Center for Academic Advisement and Student Success.

 

The full academic calendar, including many other important dates, and the undergraduate final exam “grid” are available on the Office of the Registrar’s website.

 

 

Evaluation criteria for written work:

 

The Unsatisfactory Paper.

The D or F paper either has no thesis or else it has one that is strikingly vague, broad, or uninteresting. There is little indication that the writer understands the material being presented. The paragraphs do not hold together; ideas do not develop from sentence to sentence. This paper usually repeats the same thoughts again and again, perhaps in slightly different language but often in the same words. The D or F paper is filled with mechanical faults, errors in grammar, and errors in spelling.

The C Paper.

The C paper has a thesis, but it is vague and broad, or else it is uninteresting or obvious. It does not advance an argument that anyone might care to debate. "Henry James wrote some interesting novels." "Modern cities are interesting places."

The thesis in the C paper often hangs on some personal opinion. If the writer is a recognized authority, such an expression of personal taste may be noteworthy, but writers gain authority not merely by expressing their tastes but by justifying them. Personal opinion is often the engine that drives an argument, but opinion by itself is never sufficient. It must be defended.

The C paper rarely uses evidence well; sometimes it does not use evidence at all. Even if it has a clear and interesting thesis, a paper with insufficient supporting evidence is a C paper.

The C paper often has mechanical faults, errors in grammar and spelling, but please note: a paper without such flaws may still be a C paper.

The B Paper.

The reader of a B paper knows exactly what the author wants to say. It is well organized, it presents a worthwhile and interesting idea, and the idea is supported by sound evidence presented in a neat and orderly way. Some of the sentences may not be elegant, but they are clear, and in them thought follows naturally on thought. The paragraphs may be unwieldy now and then, but they are organized around one main idea. The reader does not have to read a paragraph two or three times to get the thought that the writer is trying to convey.

The B paper is always mechanically correct. The spelling is good, and the punctuation is accurate. Above all, the paper makes sense throughout. It has a thesis that is limited and worth arguing. It does not contain unexpected digressions, and it ends by keeping the promise to argue and inform that the writer makes in the beginning.

The A Paper.

The A paper has all the good qualities of the B paper, but in addition it is lively, well paced, interesting, even exciting. The paper has style. Everything in it seems to fit the thesis exactly. It may have a proofreading error or two, or even a misspelled word, but the reader feels that these errors are the consequence of the normal accidents all good writers encounter. Reading the paper, we can feel a mind at work. We are convinced that the writer cares for his or her ideas, and about the language that carries them.

 

Course Information

Brooklyn College

The City University of New York                                                                                                  

 Professor Jillian Weinstein

 Office hours: Wednesdays 5:30-6:30

Contact: Jill.Weinstein25@Brooklyn.cuny.edu

English 1010

Fall 2018

3 Hours and conference; 3 credits

Readings and Resources

Schedule

Class Schedule:

 

Class Date

 Assignment Due on This Day: (writing and reading- bring to class complete)

8/27 Monday

Week 1

 

Intro & Diagnostic Essay & Freshman Common Reading

- Freshman Common Reading, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah

8/29 Wednesday

Week 1

 

Intro & Diagnostic Essay & Freshman Common Reading

- Freshman Common Reading, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah

9/5 Wednesday (Monday Schedule)

Week 2

 

Freshman Common Reading: Focus on close reading, annotating, summary

- Freshman Common Reading Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah

 

9/12 Wednesday

Week 2

 

Freshman Common Reading: Focus on close reading, annotating, summary

- Freshman Common Reading Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah

 

 

- Personal Narrative, 2 drafts

9/17 Monday

Week 3

 

4 Summary: Focus on close reading, annotation, short summary

- Summary on the in class reading of “A Letter to My Mother That She will Never Read”

 

9/24 Monday

Week 3

 

4 Summary: Focus on close reading, annotation, short summary

- Revision of Summary on the in class reading of “A Letter to My Mother That She will Never Read”

 

- Personal Narrative Revisions

9/26 Wednesday

Week 4

 

4 Summary: Focus on close reading, annotation, short summary

- Read Solnit, Rebecca, “Men Explain Things to Me”,  provide a short analysis

 

10/1 Monday

Week 4

 

4 Summary: Focus on close reading, annotation, short summary

Read Morris, Errol, “Liar, Liar Pants on Fire”

 

Read Sontag, Susan, “Regarding the Pain of Others”

 

Close read and annotate both, come to class with short summaries and analysis of both for in class assignment

10/3 Wednesday

Week 5

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

- Analytical Essay (2 drafts)

10/10 Wednesday

Week 5

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

 Read Eighner, Lars “On Dumpster Diving” – annotate, provide short summary

10/15 Monday

Week 6

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

- Marche, Stephen, “We Are Not All Created Equal: The Truth About the American Class System”

- Fill in distributed worksheet as you read this text

10/17 Wednesday

Week 6

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

 

 

- Read Crawford, Matthew, “The Case for Working with Your Hands”, Continue filling in worksheet used in last weeks reading assignment

10/22 Monday

Week 7

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

Come to class with 2 copies of your thesis statement from your analytical essays that were handed in on 10/3

10/24 Wednesday

Week 7

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

- Read Carr, Nicholas, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?: What the Internet is doing to our brains”- fill in worksheet provided

10/29 Monday

Week 8

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

Analytical Essay Revision due

10/31 Wednesday

Week 8

 

Writing from a position: Focus on argument, thesis statements, evidence, structure

- Read Chaudhry, Lakshmi, “Mirror, Mirror on the Web”—Assignment- find two additional primary sources and incorporate them into the text

11/5 Monday

Week 9

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Read and annotate Meltzer, Marisa, “The Last Feminist Taboo” use provided worksheet

11/7 Wednesday

Week 9

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

- Thesis Statement due – Compare/contrast Essay

 

 

11/12  Monday

Week 10

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Outline- Compare/contrast Due

 

Read and annotate Wallace, David Foster, “Consider the Lobster”

11/14 Wednesday

Week 10

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

2 drafts due compare and contrast

11/19 Monday
Week 11

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Anyon, Jean, “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”

 

 

Gatto, John Taylor, “Against School: How public education cripples our kids, and why”

 

Close Read each text, annotate

11/21 Wednesday

Week 11

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Second Readings of Anyon, Jean, “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”

 

 

Gatto, John Taylor, “Against School: How public education cripples our kids, and why” – Fill in provided worksheet for both

 

11/26 Monday

Week 12

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Saunders, George, "The Braindead Megaphone"Read/annotate (worksheet- making your own scaffold for close reading)

11/28 Wednesday

Week 12

 

Compare and Contrast: Focus on argument, evidence, structure

Revision of Compare and Contrast Essay Due

12/3 Monday

Week 13

Research & Catch-up

Read/annotate in handbook MLA citation

12/5 Wednesday

Week 13

 

Research & Catch-up

Final Catch up day- late work (penalty)

12/10 Monday

Week 14

 

Exam prep

 Review scoring rubrics, come to class prepared with questions for discussion

12/12 Wednesday

Week 14

 

Exam prep

- Read and annotate exam essay (long)

12/17 Monday

Final Exams

12/19 Wednesday

Final Exams

 

* If for some reason you receive a non-passing grade on one of the five essays, you will be able to revise the essay based on feedback.  If the revision is sufficient and the essay meets criteria, the grade you earned will be changed.