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ENGLISH 1012: English Composition II: Expository Writing: Student Version: Killian, Amanda Spring 2020

Student Version of ENG 1012

Overview

English 1012
Monday/Wednesday 9:30-10:45am (75 min)

via Discord Server HERE

Instructor: Amanda Killian
ajk354@gmail.com 

Office Hours: by appointment. 
(Please email work to be reviewed before our meeting.)
via Discord Voice Channel HERE


In English 1012 students will further develop the expository writing and critical thinking skills that they cultivated in English 1010 and study a literary topic. Readings in this class will focus on climate change and its sources & impacts. The course will culminate in a research paper that students will work on throughout the semester. Through their engagement with a variety of texts, including fiction, nonfiction, and/or poetry, students will develop their skills in summarizing, close reading, literary analysis, critical thinking, argumentation, and research.

Course Objectives

Students who complete this course successfully will be able to:

  • Read and think critically in order to understand how language operates

  • Express ideas, both orally and in writing, correctly, cogently, persuasively, and in conformity with the conventions of an academic discipline

  • Conduct research and write a research paper

  • Be able to respond proficiently in writing to literary works.

  • Display familiarity with literary works by a variety of authors in a variety of genres.

  • Be able to offer an extended discussion in writing of two or more texts and authors in relation to each other.

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret based on careful attention both to the detail and overall design of a literary work.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of context in determining meaning.

 

Grade Breakdown

Participation: 30%

Presentation: 10% 

Responses: 20% 

Research Paper: 70%

Topic Proposal: 10%

Annotated Bibliography: 10%

Outline: 5%

First Draft: 10%

Second Draft: 10%

Introduction & Conclusion: 5%

Final Draft: 20%

Assignments

Readings: You will be expected to come to class prepared, having read the assigned texts outlined below and ready to discuss. You will be graded on how well you contribute to class discussion. 

Response Questions: (100-250 words) Questions will be posted before the beginning of each class. Students should answer each questions in at least ~100 words and then respond to at least one classmate.

We will discuss your research paper in depth throughout the semester.

Class Schedule

Class 1 MON JAN 27

  • Introduction: What is a research paper? Why do students write research papers? How do students contribute to the scholarly communities of which they are part when they write research papers? What writerly voices are appropriate for research papers?

  • Discussion: Introductions, Literary Texts: Research in literature

  • Reading:  Rachel Carson, “A Fable for Tomorrow” (To be discussed during Class 2 WED JAN 29)

Class 2 WED JAN 29

  • Introduction: How can students develop their own writing processes? How does the research paper relate to the reading in the class? What is literature? How read and write about literary texts? What is close reading? What is literary research?

  • Discussion: Rachel Carson, “A Fable for Tomorrow”

  • Reading: 

Somini Sengupta, “’Bleak’ U.N. Report on a Planet in Peril Looms Over New Climate Talks” 

Margaret Atwood, “Time Capsule Found on the Dead Planet”

Class 3 MON FEB 3

Class 4 WED FEB 5

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Bolander. Review of research paper, topics & important dates. Summary and paraphrase.  

  • Groups: Integration of quotes and signal phrases into paragraphs.

  • DUE:  Reading Response #1 (Practice introducing quotations with signal phrases.)

  • Reading: Amitav Ghosh, “Where is the Fiction About Climate Change?”

Class 5 MON FEB 10

WED FEB 12 – COLLEGE CLOSED

MON FEB 17 – COLLEGE CLOSED

Class 6 WED FEB 19

  • Discussion:  Literary texts: Chandrasekera. Writing processes, annotation of sources, note-taking, organizing research, writing platforms (google docs, MSWord, etc.).

  • Reading: Pitchaya Sudbanthad, “Floating”

Class 7 MON FEB 24

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Sudbanthad. Good topics: general to focused.  

  • Groups: Brainstorming topics

  • DUE: Reading Response #2 (Focus on introducing and integrating sources; practice summary and paraphrase.)

Class 8 WED FEB 26 

Class 9 MON MAR 2 LIBRARY VISIT: ROOM 122

Class 10 WED MAR 4

  • Discussion: Literary texts: El Akkad.

  • DUE: Reading Response #3 (Focus on introducing and integrating sources; practice summary and paraphrase.)

  • Reading: Elizabeth Rush, “As the Seas Rise”

Class 11 MON MAR 9

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Rush. Primary and secondary sources. Sample Annotated Bibliography.

  • In-Class Brainstorm: Keywords & search terms

  • DUE: Reading Response #4 

  • Reading: Lauren Groff, “Eyewall”

Class 12 WED MAR 11

MON MAR 16 – NO CLASS

WED MAR 18 – NO CLASS

Class 15 MON MAR 23

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Waldman. Sample outlines & thesis statements.

Class 16 WED MAR 25

Class 17 MON MAR 30 – NO CLASS

Class 18 WED APR 1 – NO CLASS

Class 19 MON APR 6

Class 20 TUES APR 7 (Wednesday Schedule)

WED APR 8 – FRI APR 10
SPRING RECESS

Class 20.1 MON APR 13

  • STUDENT PRESENTATIONS ONLY

Class 20.2 WED APR 15

  • STUDENT PRESENTATIONS ONLY

Class 21 MON APR 20

Class 22 WED APR 22

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Solnit. Revision.

  • Groups: Peer review of first drafts

Class 23 MON APR 27

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Solnit. Introductions & Conclusions
  • DUE: First Draft: Part 2 (2-4 pages)

Class 24 WED APR 29

Class 25 MON MAY 4

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Rambo. The Difference: Revision & Editing

  • DUE: Introduction & Conclusion

Class 26 WED MAY 6

Class 27 MON MAY 11

  • Discussion: Literary texts: Rixon. Effective Editing.

  • DUE: Second Draft (5-9 pages)

Class 28 WED MAY 13

  • Discussion: Sample Final Drafts.

  • Peer Review of second draft (5-9 pages)

MON MAY 15 READING DAY – NO CLASS


Final research papers should be submitted via email by Friday, May 22nd by attachment of a pdf or word document sent to ajk354@gmail.com.