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SEED 7500X: Perspectives on Education: Teaching Children and Adolescents in Cultural Context.: Fall 2022: Home

OER for Prof. Namulundah Florence, Fall 2022

Course Information

Instructor: Professor Namulundah Florence  

Class Meetings: Virtually Online

Semester: Fall 2022:

Class day and time: MONDAY 5:05-8:25pm                          

EmailNFlorence@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Office hrs: Virtually Online and w/appointment  

VM: 347-450-2158

Syllabus: SEED 7500X

Course Materials

You will find all reading materials and videos online in folders for each week under Course Materials on the Brooklyn College Blackboard. They are also available on this Course Webpage. The readings and class discussions are drawn from these primary class texts and articles. Some are openly available on the web, some require login with a document password that Prof. Florence will supply, and some you need to login with Brooklyn College Library credentials to view. 

Course Description and Structure

The course offers an introduction to the philosophy, sociology, culture, and history of educating all children and adolescents. Development of children and adolescents in different cultures within American society in relation to existing value systems, with emphasis on the way biological and psychological factors are interpreted in accordance with prevailing values. Focus on relationship between theory and practice. Opportunities through class discussions, portfolio preparation, and field experience for reflection on oneself as teacher, interactions between school and community, teachers’ roles, and issues of diversity and social justice.

New York State Learning Standards requires a 25-hour supervised field experience that provides further opportunities for reviewing and developing teaching strategies that focus on effective relationships among schools, home, and community.

NAVIGATING THIS COURSE: SEED 7500X CODE 20044

Schooling is the common cultural experience among citizens. Yet, academic access and success differs across individuals, schools, and communities. How to explain the disparities? SEED 7500X MQ5 (6867): Perspectives on Education: Teaching Children and Adolescents in Cultural Context allows us to explore the uniqueness in schooling experience. Linking theory practice, teams will select a neighborhood for context of study.

The primary assessment in the course is a neighborhood research project to explore the impact of in- and out-of-school factors on students’ academic access and success. In-school factors are for the most part drawn from personal experience and expert insights. Out-of-school factors are explored under three categories. Work on the project is divided up in three key lenses to understand any community’s cultural environment-- demographics, commercial factors, and the school/community’s crisis management. The neighborhood project will be reported in class both as a work in progress focusing on the three areas independently and as a final integrated product at the end of the semester.

How do we achieve this end? First, teamwork allows for splitting of required tasks and development of research, writing, critical analysis, communication, and leadership skills, etc. Second, class readings offer context for scholarly discussions on disparities of both the process (academic access) and the outcome of academic success. Third, discussion forums are key to testing prior knowledge against views from classmates and experts on historical and contemporary education issues. Finally, class discussions help us deliberate and take position on issues of in- and out-of-school factors.

Class sessions alternate between synchronous and asynchronous as indicated in the schedule of classes.

Synchronous sessions:

The class discussion grade includes submission of reflections on Blackboard readings and prompts as well as your attendance at Zoom/In-person sessions. Submit your initial response by Saturday @ 12:00midnight to allow time for your classmates’ responses. The complete reflection on assigned readings should be submitted before the site closes 3:00PM to each synchronous sessions, to earn points towards attendance. If you submit after this date, you will lose a point for lateness. You can complete your initial response before this date.

Asynchronous sessions:

Submit your initial response by Saturday @ 12:00midnight to allow time for your classmates’ responses. Respond to a classmates’ posting by opening an existing thread and hitting reply for the online posting. In your response to a classmate: a) pinpoint area(s) of disagreement to posting and b) ask a question or make a comment to the author to elaborate on something they wrote. Specify why this is the case. If you submit after this date, you will lose a point for lateness. The complete response is due by Mondays @ 5:00pm. You can complete your response to a classmate before this date.

Please plan to log in to the course site no fewer than two or three times a week.  Each week of the course will have a corresponding instructional unit which will include the assigned reading, instructor commentary, and weekly discussion questions. You should complete your readings and review of the course commentary before posting answers and reflections to the discussion questions. In addition to posting your original response addressing the discussion question by Saturday at midnight, you must comment or reflect upon the postings of your peers by 3PM (synchronous) and 5:00PM (asynchronous sessions) each Monday. Earlier posts are encouraged, because they support more discussion and comments among your peers and often better help me support your learning.

Course Schedule

COURSE SCHEDULE CHANGES
I may make changes as necessary-usually because one of you finds an omission or error! - to the course schedule. If changes become necessary during this course, I will notify you by email, course announcements and/or a discussion board announcement. It is your responsibility to look for such communications about the course on a regular basis.

COURSE SCHEDULE and STRUCTURE

Course content, activities and assignments are structured using a weekly format on Blackboard. You can access these by 6:30PM of the previous week.

Unit 1: The Cultural Maze: Keeping our Eyes on the Prize

8/29     Synchronous

Overview of the course. Education vs. schooling

  • Critical race theory: Experts break down what it actually means. Jul 13, 2021

Watch Video on Youtube. 5.53minutes

  • Amnar Nawaz (PBS) Why Americans are so divided over teaching critical race theory? Jun 24, 2021. Watch Video on Youtube. 9.05 minutes

  • Reid, Joy (MSNBC). Creator Of Term ‘Critical Race Theory’ Kimberlé Crenshaw Explains What It Really Is. Jun 21, 2021. Watch Video on Youtube. 8.55minutes.

  • Xu, Kenny. Author debunks critical race theory with simple explanation. Watch Video on Youtube.. Jul 14, 2021. 4:31minutes

9/12     Synchronous

Primary and secondary research: Action research (primary sources) and Historical/analytical research (Secondary sources--School annual reports, ARIS, Media, and books/journals).  Group assignments and plan of action

  • NYC Schools, Accountability. http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/default.htm
  • Six Step Research Process Dec 18, 2013. 6.48 minutes: Watch Video on Youtube.
  • RESEARCH 1 - 2 - The Research Process. Aug 19, 2011. Watch Video on Youtube. 7.50 minutes.

Unit 2: The Cultural Beginnings: Home and School: Where and how we learn? Who succeeds?

9/19         Asynchronous

Socialization

Respond one of the readings and the video clips.

9/29    Synchronous

Emergence and Evolution of Schools in the Republic

  • Perez, Della. Social Foundations of K-12 Education. Chapter 3: The Foundations of Education in the United States. Open Web article.
  • Chen, Grace. A Relevant History of Public Education in the United States. Updated December 07, 2018. The discussion on historical foundations of schooling traces the development of the Public School in the Republic. Open Web article.

10/3     Asynchronous

The comprehensive high school, Colleges, and race in USA education

  • Wraga, W. G. (1998). The comprehensive high school and educational reform in the United States: retrospect and prospect. High School Journal, 81(3), 121+.  Open Web Article.

Unit 3: Classrooms: Teaching/Learning Dynamics

10/17   Synchronous

The challenge of teaching

  • William Ayers Ch. 1 and Ch. 2: Login with Brooklyn College Library credentials to view.
  • 10 minutes presentations on demographic changes and impact on the selected community/schools and submit 5-page paper submitted through Blackboard. Refer to school reports and bring in outlines.

10/24   Asynchronous

The Challenges of Inclusivity

  • “Falling into Life,” by Leonard Kriegel in Kenny Fries” Staring Back, pp. 37-50. Password Protected. Open Web document with Password.
  • Finding Where You Belong: A Story of Disability and Education | Joss Perring TEDxBrighton Watch Video on Youtube. 7.44 minutes
  • My Learning Disability: A Love Story | Chandni Kazi | TEDxBerkeley

Watch Video on Youtube. 13.02 minutes

The Challenges of inclusion and diversity are often underestimated by teachers.

Respond to the reading and one of the video clips.  

Unit 4: Tradition: Learning from Experience(s)

The philosophical discussion explores the impact of the classical, progressive, and feminist theories on curriculum and pedagogy in the Republic.

10/31   Synchronous

Classical theories of schooling—Socrates and Plato

  • Socrates and Plato. Reed and Johnson Ch. 1. Password Protected. Open Web document with Password.
  • 10 minutes presentations on changes in commercial activities and impact on the selected community/schools and submit 5-page paper through Blackboard. Bring in outlines.

11/7     Asynchronous

Progressive education—Jane Roland Martin

11/14   Synchronous

Presentations and team meetings

  • 10-minute presentations with a 5-page paper on role of teachers and selected schools/communities in handling at least two crises and at least two strategies for creating non-partisan communities, through Blackboard due. Bring in outlines.

11/21   Asynchronous

Society and schools— The Panaceas for African Americans: The Education Ideals of Washington, Du Bois and King

Respond to one of the scholars and both video clips.

11/28   Synchronous

  • Story Map, Memes, and logos: Completion, Submission and Sharing

Unit 5: The Nature Vs. Nurture Debate Continues

12/5     Asynchronous

  • “The Promise of Non-Cognitive Factors in Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners: The Role of Non-Cognitive Factors in Shaping School performance: A Critical Literature Review. The University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research. June 2012. Open Web article. ONLY READ CHAPTER ONE.
  • “Hard Wired for Risk: Neurological Science, "the Adolescent Brain" and Developmental Theory,” Journal of Youth Studies, 2008, Vol.11(3), p.347-360. Password Protected. Open Web document with Password.
  • Angela Lee Duckworth University of Penn Psychologist on grit-- Grit: the power of passion and perseverance: Watch Video on Youtube. 6.12 minutes

Respond to one article and the video clip

Unit 6: Storytelling: Show and Tell

12/12   Synchronous

Storytelling

  • Presentation and conferences. (Bring in outline of paper based on focus questions in syllabus)
  • Oral presentations on Zip codes and academic disparities: “analyze target audience,” “organize and present data to achieve identified goals,” and “develop public speaking skills.”  Have you? Did you?
  • Individual response to each group presentation: Write a paragraph that begins with, I was surprised that ... I learned that ... I wonder about .... Students can comment on the presentation by using Chat privately to me.

12/19   (A)Synchronous

  • Contd. Presentation and conferences and Research papers due to NFlorence@brooklyn.cuny.edu by 5:00PM.

Performance Outcomes

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES—

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy. CCRA.7 Collect and analyze data on the demographics, economics and politics as well as the receptivity to the CCSS and edTPA by integrating and evaluating content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and qualitatively, as well as in words.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy. CCRA.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence in identifying and discussing cultural hindrances to students’ learning.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy. CCRA.9 Apply theoretical positions in writing up and presenting research findings on the uniqueness of selected schools in a neighborhood by analyzing how two or more sources address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects on a selected neighborhood to better understand and deal with uniqueness therein; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L to ensure that knowledge of students informs planning and teaching. The field work assignment analyzes select schools (charter, middle school, high school, and special education class) for broad based understanding of learning in different environments.

The above objectives reflect INTASC Standards/Progressions #1(c) on collaboration with family, communities, and colleagues; face-to-face (f2f) assessment of students’ context of learning; 3 (knowledge of learning environments) as well as creating professional learning and ethnical practice. Overall, students adjust and shape pedagogies that are otherwise deemed generic or universal to the specifics of New York City schools.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLOs)

  • Students will infer the historical timeline in creating the K-12 school system—elementary and high school and describe the four pillars of the teaching/learning process—student, teacher, curriculum and environment--and the impact on student learning. REMEMBER 10 points Reflection papers
  • Students will discuss the cultural context of schooling—government policies, parental roles, teacher/student relationships, school conventions, expectations, emerging social trends, technological advances, socio-economic factors, and prevailing norms. APPLY 15 points attendance and class participation
  • Students will distinguish the positions of Plato/Socrates; Jane Roland Martin; as well as B.T. Washington, W.E.B DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr. on curriculum and pedagogy. EVALUATE 20 points
  • Students will collaboratively analyze the demographic status and changes in a select community. ANALYZE 10 points
  • Students will collaboratively analyze the commercial activities in the select neighborhoods and impact on students’ schooling. ANALYZE 10 points
  • Students will collaboratively analyze the effectiveness of teachers, schools in selected communities in handling crisis. ANALYZE 10 points
  • Students will collaboratively organize data in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography. CREATE 10 points
  • Students will collaboratively present their research findings. EVALUATE 5 points
  • Students will collaboratively depict research report online in StoryMaps as well as create a Meme or log for the paper. ANALYZE 5 points
  • Students know and collaborate with classmates to build a community of scholars. Apply 5 points

RATIONALE FOR ASSESSMENTS

  • The assessments and learning activities in the course are designed to help you meet the learning objectives and demonstrate your progress. Each assessment is directly related to one or more learning objectives, so that in the end your grade will reflect how much you have learned in the course.
  • Readings and Prompts. The weekly discussion board prompts will allow you to apply theories based on assigned readings and class discussions at the personal, social-political, and global level. You should be prepared with assignments on their assigned date. In general, you should also aim towards a greater understanding of research issues, techniques, and analysis of current research as well as formulation of findings.
  • Article analysis. During the semester, you will be asked to critique research and popular press papers. Even though each of these assignments will specify its own grading criteria, in general you will be asked to engage reading materials for interpretation and generalizability of the results. This will allow you to become a sophisticated reader of scholarly materials.
  • Class participation.  Multiple perspectives on an issue only enrich our thinking about it. For this reason, participation is an essential part of your learning in this course. Your insights will be very valuable to your fellow students and me, and you will also benefit from their ideas and interpretations. There are two ways in this course to participate: brief responses via chat as well as paired and large-class discussions.
  • The quality of participation that will be most beneficial to the class will reflect a knowledge of the readings assigned; it will be based on logic and supported by evidence; when appropriate, it should build on previous comments and move the discussion further along by adding a new insight; it might introduce new facts or probe deeper with questions; it might question underlying assumptions or refine the scope of the conversation with precise definitions; most of all, it will be respectful of other people’s comments and positions. The last point is fundamental. I realize that this course might elicit strong reactions due to deeply held personal beliefs, but we all manage our differences civilly, focusing criticism on the intellectual and scientific merit of the position, not on the person expressing it. Disrespect will not be tolerated in this course.
  • Group Work: Collaborating with others is an important life and career skills as well as an effective way to increase learning. Research also shows that the opportunity to engage in learning activities with peers greatly impacts student success and satisfaction with online courses. Therefore 25%-50% of learning activities in this course will involve communication and collaboration with your peers including weekly discussions in small groups, collaborative assignments, and group projects.
  • Research report and Presentation: The basic structure of the course focuses on a few very critical issues in gender research, but you will have the chance later to explore more in depth an area you are interested in, working in teams with other students. You will select a neighborhood to report on in two formats: an oral presentation on the topic, and paper summarizing research findings. The Research project provides an opportunity to apply standard research techniques. You will also explore primary and secondary sources. Remember to INTEGRATE secondary data rather than lining up independent cut-and-pastes like book reports. Always give credit to your sources.
  • Citations: To correctly acknowledge other scholar’s ideas in class assignments, correct citations are required. Use one of the standard reference styles: MLA, APA format or the University of Chicago Manual. Regardless of the selected citation format, students need to acknowledge the source within the text, using footnotes or endnotes and references at the end of the text. Our Reference Librarian is Beth Evans (Bevans@brooklyn.cuny.edu).
  • Oral Presentation: This research will be reported both in class as a work in progress and as a final product at the semester. Second, the complete research project will be show-cased online as part of the Open Education Resource (OER). Prepare StoryMaps to screen share during your presentation. You will have 20 minutes to present findings on the final project with 5 minutes set aside to respond to questions from your classmates.

SEED 7500X ASSESSMENT BLUEPRINT

Learning Outcomes

Cognitive Level

Assessment Type

# of Qs

# of Points

Percentage

1

Pre-class reflections:

Students will infer the historical timeline in creating the K-12 school system—elementary and high school and describe the four pillars of the teaching/learning process—student, teacher, curriculum and environment--and the impact on student learning.

One excused absence is tolerated.

Remember

How, when, and where do you learn?

Response to in- and out of class prompts that compare theories, scholars, eras with supporting evidence.

Oral and written recitations.

Require: a) position paper and b) rebuttal of at least one classmate’s post.

4 per semester to be averaged.

DATES: 3:00PM on Aug. 29; Sept. 12; Sept. 26; Nov. 28, with the lowest grade points of the assignments dropped at the end of the semester.

10 each

10

2

Students will discuss the cultural context of schooling—government policies, parental roles, teacher/student relationships, school conventions, expectations, emerging social trends, technological advances, socio-economic factors, and prevailing norms.

Understand

Class participation and in response to trigger engagements/prompts orally or in writing. Students respond in the CHAT and wait to hit SEND simultaneously.

For synchronous sessions.

Consistent and active class engagement

Whole semester participation.

15

15

3

Students will distinguish the positions of Plato/Socrates; Jane Roland Martin; and B.T. Washington, W.E.B DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr. on curriculum and pedagogy. READINGS: Philosophical Documents Ch.  Ch. 1, 10, & 12.

Evaluate

Discussion board prompts that triangulate personal views, assigned reading as well as video clips. 

Homework and discussion forums for asynchronous sessions.

Require: a) position paper and b) rebuttal of at least one classmate’s post.

6 per semester to be averaged

DATES: 5:00PM on 9/19; 10/3; 10/24; 11/7, 11/21; 12/5, with the lowest grade points of the assignments dropped at the end of the semester.

20

20

4

Students will collaboratively analyze the demographic status and changes in a select community.

5-minute oral report and submission of report.

EXCLUDE:

Coney Island

Cypress Hills

Crown Heights

Bushwick

Bay Ridge

Rockaway

Gravesend

Bensonhurst

Analyze

Students will present orally and in writing the demographic status and changes in a selected neighborhood including a) Geography and location; in some cases, names have changed; b) History of the neighborhood and if applicable, changes in architectural landscape; c) Peoples and cultures over time; and d) Unique elements to date. Include a reference list and at least one annotated bibliographic reference.

How do or have the demographics of the school and community determined students’ academic success?

1

10

10

5

Students will collaboratively analyze the commercial activities in the select neighborhoods and impact on students’ schooling.

5-minute oral report and submission of report.

Analyze

Students will present orally and in writing the impact of a select neighborhood’s (profit and non-profit) commercial activities on the area and attractiveness to both residents and non-residents. The crucial fact is how this impact shapes students’ academic access and success. Include a reference list and at least one annotated bibliographic reference.

How do or have commercial activities in the community determined students’ academic success?

1

10

10

6

Students will collaboratively analyze the effectiveness of teachers, schools in selected communities in handling crises and building community.

5-minute oral report and submission of report.

Analyze

Minimum 5-page paper on how teachers and schools in the selected community have historically handled at least two crises. Assess historical events and interventions as opposed to a focus on 2018-2021 data.

Discuss at least two ways of creating bipartisan community of learners (in schools) and social cohesion (out-of-school).

In school factors, focus on how teachers create learning communities in these partisan times. Include a reference list and at least one annotated bibliography.

How can and have schools’ and community handling of crises determined students’ academic success?

1

10

10

7

Students will collaboratively organize data in sequence of Background, Introduction, data collection/fact finding, Data analysis/ discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

Use a standard writing format SUCH AS the American Psychological Association (APA) and Modern Language Association (MLA) formats or the University of Chicago Manual of style.

CREATE

Compose the integrated neighborhood project by reviewing, revising, and integrating the three papers—demography, commercial activities, and community cohesion.

How do school and community environments determine students’ academic success? How have and can teachers create non-partisan school environments?

1

10

10

8

STORYTELLING

Each team will collaboratively present their research findings on academic access and success in specific neighborhoods.

Apply

Present and submit the neighborhood project integrating the three papers—demography, commercial activities, and community cohesion with accompanying visuals.

1

5

5

Students will engage in email, call or face-to-face interactions with fellow students and the professor outside of class to build a learning community.

Remember

Create

Keep up to date with Online Fun Fact submissions.

Know and identify at least five class members.

1

5

5

9

Students will collaboratively compose an online research report in Story map. Create a meme or log for the project.

Evaluate

Use established framework to portray the neighborhood project integrating the three papers—demography, commercial activities, and community cohesion with accompanying visuals.

Upload project on Open Education Resource (OER).

1

5

5

*** APPLY is subsumed in all my class activities in so far as students link theory to practice and lived reality (personal experiences).

BROOKLYN COURSE POLICIES

CLASSROOM ETIQUETTE: Our class will meet through the Zoom online conference system. We will adopt the same rules and norms as in a physical classroom. https://ualr.edu/disability/online-education/discussion-board-guidelines/

UNIVERSITY’S POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: The faculty and administration of Brooklyn College support an environment free from cheating and plagiarism. Each student is responsible for being aware of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism and for avoiding both. The complete text of the CUNY Academic Integrity Policy and the Brooklyn College procedure for policy implementation can be found at www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/policies. If a faculty member suspects a violation of academic integrity and, upon investigation, confirms that violation, or if the student admits the violation, the faculty member must report the violation.

CENTER FOR STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES: To receive disability-related academic accommodations students must first be registered with the Center for Student Disability Services. Students who have a documented disability or suspect they may have a disability are invited to set up an appointment with the Director of the Center for Student Disability Services, Ms. Valerie Stewart-Lovell at (718) 951-5538. If you have already registered with the Center for Student Disability Services, please provide your professor with the course accommodation form, and discuss your specific accommodation with him/her.

IMMIGRATION RESOURCES: For resources and support, please visit Brooklyn College’s Immigrant Student Support Office, 117 Roosevelt Hall, website: Immigrant Student Success Office.

GRADE POINT BREAKDOWN

Grade Point Breakdown

A+       97-100

B+       87-89.9

C+       77-79.9           

           
A         93-96.9

B         83-86.9                                   

C         70-76.9

                       
A-        90-92.9

B-        80-82.9                                   

F          below 70