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HNSC 3171 Health Aspects of Maturity and Aging (2018): Syllabus

Course Description HNS 3171

Introduction to concepts of program planning for health education in the community.  Program development, implementation, and evaluation of currently functioning community health education programs.

Print Syllabus HNS 3171

Course Objectives

At the end of the semester, students will be able to:

  • Explain the physical, psychological, mental and social changes that may accompany aging and discuss how to best confront these changes.
  • List strategies for healthful aging from behavioral, social, economical and political perspectives.
  • Identify practical considerations of older adults, including housing, finances, and health care.

Course Schedule

List of Topics associated with each day of the course
Date Topics to cover
1/30 Course Introduction
2/1, 2/6 & 2/8 Course Overview
2/13 & 2/15 Theories of Aging
2/20 No Class – Monday conversion day
2/22 & 2/27 Body Changes with Age
3/1 & 3/6 Physical Activity
3/8 & 3/13 Nutrition
3/15 & 3/22 Chronic Illnesses and Conditions pt. 1
3/20 Midterm
3/22 Chronic Illnesses and Conditions pt. 2
3/27 & 3/29 Acute Illness and Accidents
4/3 & 4/5 No Classes -- Spring Break
4/10 & 4/12 Accessibility to Medical Care

4/17, 4/19 & 4/24

4/19

Mental Health and Disorders

Blackboard Discussion assignment on video Alzheimer's: Every Minute Counts

4/26 & 5/1 Longterm Care and Living Arrangements for Seniors
5/3 Blackboard Discussion assignment on readings about "Senior Living"
5/8, 5/10 & 5/18 Student Presentations
5/17 Reading Day
  Final Exam

Semester Projects

Portrait of an older person (20%)

  • Interview a person older than 80 years of age, at least two times, keeping a log.  Make sure you prepare questions before each meeting.
  • Power point (4-5 slides only) presentation to class at the end of the semester.
  • More detailed instruction can be found at in project detail description box.
     

Article reading (10%)

  • Choose one article from the NYTimes (listed on this syllabus) or other reliable newspapers (Washington Post, etc.) or professional journals on the elderly. Summarize in one page and present in class. (distribute your one page summary to the entire class at the time of presentation.)  (5pts for oral presentation. 5pts for written report.)
  • All your assignments need to be typed, double spaced, with citations following the APA format. Use the Purdue OWL (online writing lab) for help with your citations.

In Detail - Portrait of an older person project

The "Portrait of an Older Person" project consists of two parts, interviewing someone and creating a PowerPoint presentation to give in class at the end of the semester. 


PART ONE:

Students need to interview a person older than 80 years of age, at least two times, keeping a log.  Make sure you prepare questions before each meeting.

Include:

  1. His/her demographical description/characteristics (age, gender, race, ethnicity, family, religion, profession…)
  2. His/her childhood, early adulthood, middle ages and senior years
  3. Experience of war (WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War)
  4. Activities to keep healthy
  5. Regrets, if any;
  6. Advice to younger persons

Be sensitive to the interviewee’s feelings.  Do not force to obtain his/her answer at any time.

Also remember to:

  1. Be polite and courteous.  You have to explain your purpose of your visit, i.e. class project.
  2. Remind him/her of your visit the day before, via phone, email, etc.
  3. Be punctual.
  4. Thank him/her after each of your session.  Discuss your following session, i.e. day/time before you leave.
  5. Please ask his/her permission for the class presentation, including his/her photo.

After your interviews, ask yourself:
Does this person fit to your image of a typical elderly? (based on your own experiences from other elderly, the media portrait and from what you have learned in our class (textbook, articles, class discussions).

Explain difficulties you have encountered interviewing him/her.

Any life plan change for you, after this assignment?


PART TWO:

Power point presentation to class at the end of the semester.

Keep your slides to 4-5pages.
Do not crowd each slide with too much information.


Evaluation Criteria:

You will be evaluated on: 

  1. Content of your oral report (4pts),
  2. Quality of your power point slides(4pts.),
  3. Overall presentation quality (3pts).

*Alternative option:  You could report on a person who passed away at age 95 or over, who was portrayed in the NYTimes obituary column.  Talk to the instructor if you are interested in this option.

Course Information

Academic Integrity:

The faculty and administration of Brooklyn College support an environment free from cheating and plagiarism. Each student is responsible for being aware of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism and for avoiding both. Here is the complete text of the CUNY Academic Integrity Policy and the Brooklyn College procedure for implementing that policy. If a faculty member suspects a violation of academic integrity and, upon investigation, confirms that violation, or if the student admits the violation, the faculty member is required to report the violation.


Center for Student Disability Services:

To receive disability-related academic accommodations students must first be registered with the Center for Student Disability Services. Students who have a documented disability or suspect they may have a disability should contact the Center and set up an appointment with the Director of the Center for Student Disability Services, Ms. Valerie Stewart-Lovell at 718-951-5538. If you have already registered with the Center for Student Disability Services please provide your professor with the course accommodation form and discuss your specific accommodation with the professor.


Non-Attendance Because of Religious Beliefs:

Brooklyn College complies with the New York State Education Law regarding non-attendance because of religious beliefs. For details see the Undergraduate Bulletin (pg. 66) or the Graduate Bulletin (pg. 42).

Other Important Notes to Remember

  1. It is expected that students participate in class and attend all classes.  The policy of excused and unexcused absences is outlined in the college catalog. No other absences will be excused beyond this policy. For details to the state law regarding non-attendance because of religious beliefs see the Undergraduate Bulletin (pg. 66) or the Graduate Bulletin
  2. Students are expected to follow strict professional conducts. (especially for the exam taking and written paper work, i.e. no cheating, no plagiarism of any kind, including your old work ) (See Academic Integrity Policy and the Brooklyn College procedure for implementing that policy)
  3. Students are responsible for obtaining materials covered on the day of an absence.
  4. Missed mid-term exam can be made up at the end of the semester on a designated day (To be announced).
  5. Students who are late to class and who leave class early may not receive full credit for class participation.
  6. “Inc” grade is given only when the assigned works were not completed due to  unavoidable circumstances and only when it is requested by the student.
  7. Missing an assignment “Due Date” may results in reduced points.

Course Grading Breakdown

Course grading broken down
Course Item Percentage Towards Grade
Midterm Exam 30%
Final Exam 30%
(Project) Portrait of an Older Person 20%
(Project) Article Reading 10%
Participation/Attendance 10%

Letter Grading information

Letter grades will be given following the Brooklyn College recommended criteria.

Letter Grade Number Grade Equivalent
A+ 98-
A 91-97
A- 90
B+ 88-89
B 81-87
B- 80
C+ 78-79
C 71-77
C- 70
D+ 68-69
D 61-67
D- 60

"Curving" may take place, depending upon the total class grade distribution.

In order for you to receive the full 10% credit for participation, or in order to get the semester letter grade of "A-" or better, you need to submit all your work assigned in class, on time.

All your assignments need to be typed, double spaced, following the APA format. Use the Purdue OWL (online writing lab) for help with your citations.