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WGST 4410W Senior Research Seminar: Home

For Fall 2022, Prof. Namulundah Florence

About: WGST 4410

Course Information

COURSE INFORMATION

WGST 4410W Senior Seminar Code: 4538 VS1                    Prof. Namulundah Florence

Fall 2022: Thursday 5:00-7:50PM                                      (347) 450-2158

Virtual Office hrs: W 4-5; after class and by appt.                Room: 1207 Ingersoll

NFlorence@brooklyn.cuny.edu        

Course Description and Structure

BULLETIN DESCRIPTION

3 hours; 3 credits
Required advanced seminar to study interdisciplinary theory and methodology applied to a selected theme. Colloquia and research and/or fieldwork. Senior thesis written individually or collectively. A student completing the course with distinction is recommended for honors. (Not open to students who have completed Humanities 83.1 or Social Science Interdisciplinary Studies 83.1.) Writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: English *1012 [2]; and Women's and Gender Studies 1001 [12]; and at least two courses in Women's Studies approved by the program coordinator.

COURSE STRUCTURE:

Ever produced and starred in a memorable story? You can now. In the Senior Research Seminar, you create a story from the ground up. Choose the name. Select characters. Settle on a log. Furthermore, dictate the timing and sequence of events and the ending.

The primary assessment in the course is a Research project whereby candidates create data by designing and implementing classroom research following established research procedures: (a) identifying a focus area and research question(s); (b) review of relevant literature; (c) collecting data; (d) data analysis and interpretation; and (e) limitations of study; (f) as well as an action plan of what you would do differently in view of emerging insights. The project will be reported in class both as a work in progress and as a final product to a community of scholars.

How do we achieve this end? First, collaborating in a task allows you to envision, explore and organize ideas as well as select highlights to make your case. Second, class readings offer context for scholarly discussions on both the process and product of such a task. Third, discussion forums are key to testing prior knowledge against views from classmates and experts on historical and contemporary education issues. Finally, class discussions help us compare emerging insights alongside classmates to contextualize and take a position on select topics.

The Seminar sessions alternate between synchronous and asynchronous as indicated in the schedule of classes. Synchronous sessions provide a chance to engage in review of multi-perspectives on select topics and in real time. Asynchronous sessions allow you to work independently and to process what happens in the large group. Blackboard submissions are in two parts as shown below:

1.Submit your initial response by Tuesday midnight to allow time for your classmates’ responses. If you submit after this date, you will lose a point for lateness. 

Respond to a classmate’s post by Thursdays @ 11:00AM.

2. Respond to a classmates’ posting by opening an existing thread and hitting reply for the online posting. In your response to a classmate, a) pinpoint areas of disagreement to the posting; b) ask a question or make a comment to the author to elaborate on something they wrote, c) make a comment that underscores the link between two contributors. Specify why this is the case. You can complete your response to a classmate before this date.

Please plan to log in to the course site no fewer than two or three times a week.  Each week of the course will have a corresponding instructional unit which will include the assigned reading, instructor commentary, and weekly discussion questions. You should complete your readings and review of the course commentary before posting answers and reflections to the discussion questions. In addition to posting your original response addressing the discussion question by Tuesday midnight, you must comment or reflect upon the postings of your peers by noon each Thursday. Earlier posts are encouraged, because they support more discussion and comments among your peers and often better help me support your learning.

Course Materials

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS:
On intersectionality:

  • Chinese women: Once Iron Girls : Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women, edited by Hui Wu, Lexington Books, 2009. ProQuest Ebook Central. Login with BC Library credentials to view.
  • Indigenous women: Mouchref, M. (2016). Representations of indigenous feminism and social change. Cultural Intertexts, 6, 82-93. Open web article.
  • Transwomen: Thriving as a Trans Woman Took Me Years. Here's What I Learned Along the Way: Open web article.
  • Women with disability: With the Power of Each Breath: Open web article.
  • Refugee women: Life as a female refugee: ‘You don’t know who to trust’: Open web article.
  • Corporate women/female politicians: When the Canary Stops Singing: Women’s Perspectives on Transforming Business: Open web article.
  • Single mothers: “I Have a Fear of Really Screwing It Up”: The Fears, Doubts, Anxieties, and Judgments of One American Single Mother by Choice: Login with BC Library credentials to view.
  • Black women: Strumm, Brianna (2019/04/23). bell hooks: The teacher, the feminist pedagogue, the film critic, the activist and most of all, the black feminist. SP  - 54. 31(1). DO  - 10.11157/anzswj-vol31iss1id538. Open web article.
  • Immigrant women: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie - “Dear Ijeawele” & Raising a Child to Be a Feminist | The Daily Show: Watch video on Youtube. 10.55 Minutes

Course Schedule

COURSE SCHEDULE— Tuesdays 5:00-7:50PM

IMPORTANT DATES FALL  2022 SEMESTER

August 25                               First day of class

September 2-4                       No classes scheduled

September 5                          College closed Labor Day observed

September 26-29                   No classes scheduled

September 29                        Conversion Day-classes follow Monday schedule

October 4-5                            No classes scheduled

October 10                             College closed – Columbus Day

November 24-25                    College closed – Thanksgiving Recess

November 26-27                    No classes scheduled

December 14                         Reading Day

December 15-21                    Final examinations day/evening/weekend

8/25       Overview of the course; Discussion of course requirements and Assignments                    

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on How to Write and How to Read. Open web article.

                       

9/1       How and where are stories told? Which stories are left out?

Research: Definitions, characteristics, and types of research particularly quantitative and qualitative approaches

9/8       Who tells these stories? Are these storytellers like you?

  • Research and significance with emphasis on definition, basis, purpose, benefits, and research process.
  • Wigginton, Britta & LaFrance, Michelle N L. (2019). Learning Critical Feminist Research: A Brief Introduction to Feminist Epistemologies and Methodologies Feminism & Psychology 0(0) 1–17. DOI: 10.1177/0959353519866058. Open Web Article.

9/15     What do I really want to know? What can I change? What do people avoid addressing? Identify researchable problems: Possibilities and limitations of research.

by Shona McCombes. Rvd 6/5/2020. Open Web article.

  • Six Step Research Process Dec 18, 2013. Tulsa Community College. 6.48 minutes. Watch Video on Youtube.
  • Dixon, Violet K. 2011. Western Feminism in a Global Perspective. Inquiries Journal/Student Pulse 3 (02). Link to open article.

9/22     Where do I find supporting evidence to make my case? Literature review and Research design: Articles 1-4, address literary review frameworks; articles 5-end address multiple life experiences.

  • The Literature Review | A Complete Step-by-Step Guide

Published on February 22, 2019 by Shona McCombes. Revised on August 27, 2021.

10/6     Discussion by Technician on creating StoryMaps and meme or log for the paper.

10/13   What do know? Who can I ask? Who wrote about this? Where else can I look?

Data collection: Techniques and strategies including experience, inquiry and examination of documents and other data sources

10/20   How do I assemble the pieces of my puzzle? Data analysis and interpretation: Analysis, synthesis, theory in summarizing research findings

  • Data analysis in research: Why data, types of data, data analysis in qualitative and quantitative research. Open Web article.

10/27   A Glimpse of My Road Map—RESEARCH DESIGN

  • Research proposal roundtable sessions (Who, What, Why, where, When, and How of research project as well as data triangulation). 4-page research report due.
  • Presentation and conferences. (Bring in outline of paper based on focus questions in syllabus)
  • Key objectives in oral presentations: “analyze target audience,” “organize and present data to achieve identified goals,” and “develop public speaking skills.”  Have you? Did you?
  • Individual response to each group presentation: Write a paragraph that begins with, I was surprised that ... I learned that ... I wonder about .... Students can comment on the presentation by using Chat privately to me.

11/3     It is true but do I really want to say this? Ethical dilemmas in conducting classroom research: Representation, ownership, and responsibilities of researchers. Class text and discussions address the challenge of objectivity in the research process and dissemination of findings.

  • What is ethics in research & why is it important? by David B. Resnik, J.D., Ph.D. December 23, 2020. Open Web article.
  • Smentkowski, Brian P & Houck, Aaron M. (September 22, 2020). Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Encyclopædia Britannica. Open Web article.
  • RBG’s Mixed Record on Race and Criminal Justice: The Marshall Project. Open Web article.

11/10   Be a part of history. Leave a record. Report Writing and Action planning for change.  The final report integrates class texts and discussions as well as ongoing issues in feminist discourse.

  • Sacred Heart Library.  All aspects of the research process. Open Web article.

                         

11/17   Going one-on-one with your project. Individual conferencing

12/1     Individual conferencing & uploading documents on Blackboard Contd.

12/8     Individual conferencing & uploading documents on Blackboard Contd.

12/15   Storytelling time: Show and tell. PRESENTATIONS ON YOUR RESEARCH,

  • Presentation and conferences. (Bring in outline of paper based on focus questions in syllabus)
  • Key objectives in oral presentations: “analyze target audience,” “organize and present data to achieve identified goals,” and “develop public speaking skills.”  Have you? Did you?
  • Individual response to each group presentation: Write a paragraph that begins with, I was surprised that ... I learned that ... I wonder about .... Students can comment on the presentation by using Chat privately to me.
  • Final completed research paper submitted to NFlorence@brooklyn.cuny.edu by 5:00PM on December 12. Late papers will not be accepted. StoryMaps assistance by Prof. Emily Fairey Emily.Fairey86@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Performance Outcomes

PERFORMANCE LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Pre-class reflection prompts: Students will compare personal views with historical and contemporary feminist scholars and discourses on discussion board forums. UNDERSTAND/EVALUATE: 15 points
  • Class participation: Students will outline and review the seven-step sequence of a research process—Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography. REMEMBER: 20 points
  • Research paper: Students will design and present orally and in writing a RESEARCH DESIGN with background, introduction, literature review and methodology. CREATE: 15 points
  • Students will organize the complete research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography. ANALYZE: 20 points
  • Students will compose an online research report in StoryMaps and Meme or logo for the paper. EVALUATE: 10 points
  • Students will present their research findings at the Senior brown bag Seminar Symposium. CREATE:10 points
  • Students will engage in email, call or face-to-face interactions with fellow students and the professor outside of class to build a learning community. APPLY:10 points
RATIONALE FOR ASSESSMENTS

The assessments and learning activities in the course are designed to help you meet the learning objectives and demonstrate your progress. Each assessment is directly related to one or more learning objectives, so that in the end your grade will reflect how much you have learned in the course.

Readings and Prompts. The weekly discussion board prompts will allow you to apply theories based on assigned readings and class discussions at the personal, social-political, and global level. You should be prepared with assignments on their assigned date. You will be expected to ask questions and provide ideas to expand on issues raised during class discussion. In general, you should also aim towards a greater understanding of research issues, techniques, and analysis of current research as well as formulation of findings. The Research project provides an opportunity to apply standard research techniques.

Article analysis. Throughout the semester, you will be asked to critique research and popular press papers. Even though each of these assignments will specify its own grading criteria, in general you will be asked to evaluate reading materials with respect to bias, study design, sampling methods, research methodology, interpretation and generalizability of the results. This will allow you to become a sophisticated reader of scholarly materials.

Class participation.  Multiple perspectives on an issue only enrich our thinking about it. For this reason, participation is an essential part of your learning in this course. Your insights will be very valuable to your fellow students and me, and you will also benefit from their ideas and interpretations. There are two ways in this course to participate: brief responses via chat as well as paired and large-class discussions.

Students are expected to attend class and be prepared to apply concepts to current discussions. Attendance is important and so is the quality of students’ inputs and consistency of participation. Students should be prepared with assignments on the assigned date. In listening to others' presentations, students will be expected to ask questions and provide ideas to expand on their insights.

Here are some reminders. All conversations will take place courteously. The quality of participation that will be most beneficial to the class will reflect a knowledge of the readings assigned; it will be based on logic and supported by evidence; when appropriate, it should build on previous comments and move the discussion further along by adding a new insight; it might introduce new facts or probe deeper with questions; it might question underlying assumptions or refine the scope of the conversation with precise definitions; most of all, it will be respectful of other people’s comments and positions. The last point is fundamental. I realize that this course might elicit strong reactions due to deeply held personal beliefs, but we all manage our differences civilly, focusing criticism on the intellectual and scientific merit of the position, not on the person expressing it. Disrespect will not be tolerated in this course.

Group Work: Collaborating with others is an important life and career skills as well as an effective way to increase learning. Research also shows that the opportunity to engage in learning activities with peers greatly impacts student success and satisfaction with online courses. Therefore 25%-50% of learning activities in this course will involve communication and collaboration with your peers including weekly discussions in pairs and small groups.

Presentation + RESEARCH REPORT.  The basic structure of the course focuses on a few very critical issues in gender research, but you will have the chance later to explore more in depth an area of interest to you. You will identify a topic to report on in two formats: an oral presentation on the topic, and paper summarizing the research and its limitations. The Research project provides an opportunity to apply standard research techniques. You will also explore primary and secondary sources.

Primary sources are written contemporaneously with the events they describe such as interviews of significant cultural persons and document review whenever possible to ascertain ethnic experiences, particularly here in the United States.  In addition, draw on relevant artifacts such as pictures, diaries, journals, passports, working papers, school reports, legal documentation, etc., to enhance the quality of the assignment. 

Literature review: Secondary sources build on, quote, and use other people’s research because the researcher did not directly experience the event. These sources are based on and often quote primary sources such as encyclopedias, periodicals, and books. In addition, draw on existing works of fiction, art, film, or play exists that document the period or experiences of your ancestors to enhance the quality of your research. Remember to INTEGRATE secondary data rather than lining up independent cut-and-pastes like book reports. Always give credit to your sources.

To correctly acknowledge other scholar’s ideas in class assignments, correct citations are required. Use one of the standard reference styles: MLA, APA format or the University of Chicago Manual. Regardless of the selected citation format, students need to acknowledge the source within the text, using footnotes or endnotes and references at the end of the text. Our Reference Librarian is Beth Evans (Bevans@brooklyn.cuny.edu).

Oral Presentation: This research will be reported both in class as a work in progress and as a final product at a semester-end Woman’s Studies Program Brown Bag Luncheon. Second, the complete research project will be show-cased online as part of the Open Education Resource (OER). Prepare PowerPoint slides to screen share during your presentation. You will have about 30 minutes to present findings on the final project with 5 minutes set aside to respond to questions from your classmates.

RUBRIC: WGST 4410W: Senior Research Seminar

Assignment                 Exceeds expectations              Meets expectations     Below expectation

Final Research paper

ANALYZE 20 points

12-page complete report on research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

At least ten references. All research articles. Variety of journals used.

Understands the rules of citation and avoid plagiarizing.

Adequate 12-page complete report on research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

Mostly peer-reviewed 8-10 references. Mostly research articles and websites used.

Gives credit to most sources for secondary literature. Understands the rules of citation.

Late, incomplete, or unsystematic 12-page report on research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

Less than 8 peer-reviewed references. Some books and internet websites used.

Cheats and plagiarizes.  Inconsistency in referencing format.

Pre-class reflection prompts: Students will compare personal views with historical and contemporary feminist scholars and discourses on discussion board forums. UNDERSTAND/EVALUATE. 15 points.

Detailed and explicit responses to Discussion board prompts that triangulate personal views, assigned reading as well as video clips. Critique a classmate’s response to assigned materials.

Adequate responses to Discussion board prompts that triangulate personal views, assigned reading as well as video clips. Critique a classmate’s response to assigned materials.

Limited and irregular responses to Discussion board prompts that triangulate personal views, assigned reading as well as video clips. Often fails to critique a classmate’s response to assigned materials.

Roundtable sessions on RESEARCH DESIGN

CREATE

15 points

Minimum 4-page design and present orally and in writing a RESEARCH DESIGN with explicit background, introduction, literature review and methodology as well as a beginner’s reference list.

Adequate 4-page design and present orally and in writing a RESEARCH DESIGN with background, introduction, literature review and methodology as well as a beginner’s reference list.

Submit late or poorly drafted designed and presented RESEARCH DESIGN without a clear background, introduction, literature review and methodology as well as a beginner’s reference list.

Class participation

Semester long assessment.

REMEMBER

20 points

Consistent preparation and participation in class discussions based on assigned readings.

Correctly recognize multiple interpretations and distinguish fact from opinion and analysis.

Actively listens to others in class, supporting their views even if they differ from one’s own. Asks clarifying questions. Allows others to voice their views.

Stellar attendance record.

Frequent preparation and participation in class discussions as well as paired projects based on assigned readings.

Generally aware of multiple interpretations and distinguish fact from opinion and analysis.

Listens to others in class and/or field settings. Responds appropriately to what others say. Can take in points of view that differ from one’s own.

Legitimate if any absences from class.

Infrequent preparation and participation in class discussions as well as paired projects based on assigned readings.

Shows no awareness of multiple interpretations and distinguish fact from opinion and analysis.

Does not listen to others in the class and/or field settings. Interrupts others. Dominates conversation. Is unwilling to diverse points of view.

More than two legitimate absences and tardiness.

Brown bag Symposium on final project

CREATE

10 points

Preparedness: Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed.

Content:  Provides handouts that are clear and show key issues. Cites at least three sources related to the target audience. Presents concise. PowerPoint slides. Provides clear reasons why information is relevant.

Preparedness: Student seems quite prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals.

Content: Shows a good understanding of the topic. Part of information is presented without rationale. Cites two sources related to the target audience.

Preparedness: Student does not seem prepared to present.

Content: Does not seem to understand the topic very well. No rationale is provided regarding why information presented is relevant. Does not cite sources related to the target audience.

Story map (OER) Construction and meme or log for the paper.

CREATE

10 points

Create key sections of research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

Create adequate sections on research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

Late, incomplete, or unsystematic upload of research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

WGST 4410W’s ASSESSMENT BLUEPRINT

Learning Outcomes

Cognitive Level

Assessment Type

# of Qs

# of Points

Percentage

1

Pre-class reflection prompts: Students will compare personal views with historical and contemporary feminist scholars and discourses on discussion board forums.

One excused absence is tolerated.

Understand

& Evaluate

Discussion board prompts that triangulate personal views, assigned reading as well as video clips. Students also critique a classmate’s response to assigned materials.

Homework assignments and discussion forums.

12 per semester.

No pre-class reflections papers on presentation of Research design and final paper

15

These are averaged with a drop of the lowest score.

15

2

Class participation: Students will outline and review the seven-step sequence of a research process—Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography

Remember

Response to in- and out of class prompts that compare theories, scholars, eras with supporting evidence.

Consistent and active class engagement

Oral and written recitations

Throughout the semester

20

20

3

Students will design and present orally and in writing a RESEARCH DESIGN with background, introduction, literature review and methodology. 15 points

Create

Submit initial components of research project of scholar or selected topic with accompanying visuals.

(Mid-term task to draft a framework for the research study)

1

.

15

4

Complete research paper:

Students will organize complete research findings in sequence of Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography

Use a standard writing format SUCH AS the American Psychological Association (APA) and Modern Language Association (MLA) formats or the University of Chicago Manual of style.

Analyze

Compose the complete written research paper on scholar selected topic with accompanying visuals based on the seven-step sequence of a research process—Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

1

20

20

5

Dress rehearsal

Students will compose an online research report in Story map and meme or a logo for the paper.

Evaluate

Compose an online report on scholar selected topic with accompanying visuals based on the seven-step sequence of a research process—Background, Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology/data collection/fact finding, Data analysis—findings and discussion, Conclusion, and the Reference list/bibliography.

(Select sections for Online display)

1

10

10

6

Storytelling:

Students will present research findings at the Senior Seminar brown bag SYMPOSIUM.

Create

Submit complete written and uploaded research project on scholar or selected topic with accompanying visuals.

Oral reports of completed project in public forum.

Upload project on Open Education Resource (OER)

1

10

10

9

Students will engage in email, call or face-to-face interactions with fellow students and the professor outside of class to build a learning community.

Remember

Create

Keep up to date with Online Fun Fact submissions.

Know and identify at least five class members.

1

10

10

*** APPLY is subsumed in all my class activities in so far as students link theory to practice and lived reality (personal experiences). Structure adapted from Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Any late assignments will automatically be lowered two grade points.  There is no make-up for missed presentations. 

BROOKLYN COURSE POLICIES

CLASSROOM ETIQUETTE: Our class will meet through the Zoom online conference system. We will adopt the same rules and norms as in a physical classroom. https://ualr.edu/disability/online-education/discussion-board-guidelines/

UNIVERSITY’S POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: The faculty and administration of Brooklyn College support an environment free from cheating and plagiarism. Each student is responsible for being aware of what constitutes cheating and plagiarism and for avoiding both. The complete text of the CUNY Academic Integrity Policy and the Brooklyn College procedure for policy implementation can be found at www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/policies. If a faculty member suspects a violation of academic integrity and, upon investigation, confirms that violation, or if the student admits the violation, the faculty member must report the violation.

CENTER FOR STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES: To receive disability-related academic accommodations students must first be registered with the Center for Student Disability Services. Students who have a documented disability or suspect they may have a disability are invited to set up an appointment with the Director of the Center for Student Disability Services, Ms. Valerie Stewart-Lovell at (718) 951-5538. If you have already registered with the Center for Student Disability Services, please provide your professor with the course accommodation form, and discuss your specific accommodation with him/her.

IMMIGRATION RESOURCES: For resources and support, please visit Brooklyn College’s Immigrant Student Support Office, 117 Roosevelt Hall, website: Immigrant Student Success Office or visit: https://libguides.brooklyn.cuny.edu/DACA

 

Grade Point Breakdown

A+       97-100

B-        80-82.9

D         63-66.9           

           
A         93-96.9

C+       77-79.9                                   

D-        60-62.9

                       
A-        90-92.9

C         73-76.9                                   

F          0-59-9

B+       87-89.9

 C-       70-72.9

B        83-86.9

D+         67-69.9