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Academic Integrity Tutorial for Undergraduates: Quoting and Paraphrasing

Quoting and Paraphrasing

Quoting and Paraphrasing

Quoting

Quoting

What is Quoting?

Quoting is when one uses the EXACT wording of the source materials. Direct quotations should be used to strengthen and support your own arguments and ideas and should be used sparingly.

When Should One Quote?

One should use direct quotations:

  • When not using the author's exact wording would change the original meaning
  • To lend authority to the point you are trying to make
  • When the language of the quote is significant
Dombrowski, Quinn. The "Library". 10 Jun. 2010. Flikrhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/4692181263

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing is when you create your own wording of essential information and ideas expressed by someone else without directly quoting. Paraphrasing is similar to summarizing, however summaries only include the essential ideas of a work, while paraphrasing includes more details. 

Since your paper should only use direct quotations sparingly, you'll probably be paraphrasing frequently. Just remember that you still need to express plenty of your own ideas. Use paraphrasing to support those ideas, and be mindful that you still need to cite paraphrased portions of your paper.

WORD TO THE WISE!

Changing every third word in a passage does not count as paraphrasing. You are better off quoting and citing the actual source!

 

 

 

The Academic Integrity Quiz