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CLAS 3239 | Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities: About the Authors

Welcome to Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities, a course designed to introduce you to the main themes and ideas in the medical literature produced by the ancient Greeks and Romans.

About the Authors of this Site

Michael Goyette

Michael Goyette holds a doctorate in Classics from The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY). He is currently an Visiting Assistant Professor at New College of Florida. He developed this site while teaching at Brooklyn College both to further engage his ancient medicine students, and to provide resources to interested people outside of Brooklyn College. Michael also specializes in Greek and Roman tragedy, and he has taught courses on a variety of topics, including Greek and Roman civilization and literature, Greek and Roman mythology, ancient Greek language, Latin language at all levels, and the Greek and Latin Roots of the English language. He has developed creative pedagogies to engage students in the study of these subjects, and he was selected as the recipient of Brooklyn College's 2015 Award for Excellence in Teaching for a Part-Time Faculty Member.

recently defended his PhD dissertation entitled Roman Tragedy and Medicine: Language and Imagery of Illness in Seneca and Celsus. In support of this work, he was awarded a competitive dissertation completion fellowship from The Graduate Center.

Michael also took MA and MPhil degrees in Classics at The Graduate Center, and a BA in Classical Studies: Greek from Vassar College. His current research interests include ancient medicine, Greek and Roman tragedy, the Roman novel, and the pedagogy of Classics. He has also gained experience with material culture through his participation in the 2011 Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and by helping excavate an archaic period sanctuary of Apollo on the Greek island of Despotiko.

Michael has had three articles published in respected academic journals, and he has presented research papers at conferences held by the American Philological Association / Society for Classical Studies (in both 2012 and 2015), the Classical Association of Canada, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of South Carolina. He will be presenting a paper entitled “Language of Mental Illness in Seneca’s Tragedies and Celsus” at a conference at the University of Miami in March 2015. At The Graduate Center, Michael organized graduate student conferences which brought together speakers from across the world. He was the chair of the conference Living on the Edge: Liminality in Classical Antiquity in April 2010, and followed this up by co-chairing the conference Spes et Ratio Studiorum: Education in the Classical World in May 2011. Michael regularly teaches a core curriculum course on Greek and Roman literature and culture at Brooklyn College. There he has also taught courses such as Greek and Roman Mythology, The Self and Society, and Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities, a course completely of his own design. His teaching efforts at Brooklyn College have been recognized by an award for exceptional pedagogy. Michael has also taught courses at The City College of New York, including Elementary Latin and The Greek and Latin Roots of the English Language, and he is teaching an Intermediate Latin course focused on Vergil’s Aeneid at Hunter College in Spring 2015. Michael frequently attends pedagogical seminars in order to refine his teaching skills and to explore innovative ways of educating and engaging diverse groups of students. In recent semesters, he has successfully implemented Team-Based Learning (TBL) pedagogy in several courses after receiving training in this method from Brooklyn College’s TBL Academy in 2013. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Classics/Students#sthash.nlugoqxs.dpuf
recently defended his PhD dissertation entitled Roman Tragedy and Medicine: Language and Imagery of Illness in Seneca and Celsus. In support of this work, he was awarded a competitive dissertation completion fellowship from The Graduate Center.

Michael also took MA and MPhil degrees in Classics at The Graduate Center, and a BA in Classical Studies: Greek from Vassar College. His current research interests include ancient medicine, Greek and Roman tragedy, the Roman novel, and the pedagogy of Classics. He has also gained experience with material culture through his participation in the 2011 Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and by helping excavate an archaic period sanctuary of Apollo on the Greek island of Despotiko.

Michael has had three articles published in respected academic journals, and he has presented research papers at conferences held by the American Philological Association / Society for Classical Studies (in both 2012 and 2015), the Classical Association of Canada, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of South Carolina. He will be presenting a paper entitled “Language of Mental Illness in Seneca’s Tragedies and Celsus” at a conference at the University of Miami in March 2015. At The Graduate Center, Michael organized graduate student conferences which brought together speakers from across the world. He was the chair of the conference Living on the Edge: Liminality in Classical Antiquity in April 2010, and followed this up by co-chairing the conference Spes et Ratio Studiorum: Education in the Classical World in May 2011. Michael regularly teaches a core curriculum course on Greek and Roman literature and culture at Brooklyn College. There he has also taught courses such as Greek and Roman Mythology, The Self and Society, and Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities, a course completely of his own design. His teaching efforts at Brooklyn College have been recognized by an award for exceptional pedagogy. Michael has also taught courses at The City College of New York, including Elementary Latin and The Greek and Latin Roots of the English Language, and he is teaching an Intermediate Latin course focused on Vergil’s Aeneid at Hunter College in Spring 2015. Michael frequently attends pedagogical seminars in order to refine his teaching skills and to explore innovative ways of educating and engaging diverse groups of students. In recent semesters, he has successfully implemented Team-Based Learning (TBL) pedagogy in several courses after receiving training in this method from Brooklyn College’s TBL Academy in 2013. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Classics/Students#sthash.nlugoqxs.dpuf
recently defended his PhD dissertation entitled Roman Tragedy and Medicine: Language and Imagery of Illness in Seneca and Celsus. In support of this work, he was awarded a competitive dissertation completion fellowship from The Graduate Center.

Michael also took MA and MPhil degrees in Classics at The Graduate Center, and a BA in Classical Studies: Greek from Vassar College. His current research interests include ancient medicine, Greek and Roman tragedy, the Roman novel, and the pedagogy of Classics. He has also gained experience with material culture through his participation in the 2011 Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and by helping excavate an archaic period sanctuary of Apollo on the Greek island of Despotiko.

Michael has had three articles published in respected academic journals, and he has presented research papers at conferences held by the American Philological Association / Society for Classical Studies (in both 2012 and 2015), the Classical Association of Canada, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of South Carolina. He will be presenting a paper entitled “Language of Mental Illness in Seneca’s Tragedies and Celsus” at a conference at the University of Miami in March 2015. At The Graduate Center, Michael organized graduate student conferences which brought together speakers from across the world. He was the chair of the conference Living on the Edge: Liminality in Classical Antiquity in April 2010, and followed this up by co-chairing the conference Spes et Ratio Studiorum: Education in the Classical World in May 2011. Michael regularly teaches a core curriculum course on Greek and Roman literature and culture at Brooklyn College. There he has also taught courses such as Greek and Roman Mythology, The Self and Society, and Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities, a course completely of his own design. His teaching efforts at Brooklyn College have been recognized by an award for exceptional pedagogy. Michael has also taught courses at The City College of New York, including Elementary Latin and The Greek and Latin Roots of the English Language, and he is teaching an Intermediate Latin course focused on Vergil’s Aeneid at Hunter College in Spring 2015. Michael frequently attends pedagogical seminars in order to refine his teaching skills and to explore innovative ways of educating and engaging diverse groups of students. In recent semesters, he has successfully implemented Team-Based Learning (TBL) pedagogy in several courses after receiving training in this method from Brooklyn College’s TBL Academy in 2013. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Classics/Students#sthash.nlugoqxs.dpuf
recently defended his PhD dissertation entitled Roman Tragedy and Medicine: Language and Imagery of Illness in Seneca and Celsus. In support of this work, he was awarded a competitive dissertation completion fellowship from The Graduate Center.

Michael also took MA and MPhil degrees in Classics at The Graduate Center, and a BA in Classical Studies: Greek from Vassar College. His current research interests include ancient medicine, Greek and Roman tragedy, the Roman novel, and the pedagogy of Classics. He has also gained experience with material culture through his participation in the 2011 Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and by helping excavate an archaic period sanctuary of Apollo on the Greek island of Despotiko.

Michael has had three articles published in respected academic journals, and he has presented research papers at conferences held by the American Philological Association / Society for Classical Studies (in both 2012 and 2015), the Classical Association of Canada, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of South Carolina. He will be presenting a paper entitled “Language of Mental Illness in Seneca’s Tragedies and Celsus” at a conference at the University of Miami in March 2015. At The Graduate Center, Michael organized graduate student conferences which brought together speakers from across the world. He was the chair of the conference Living on the Edge: Liminality in Classical Antiquity in April 2010, and followed this up by co-chairing the conference Spes et Ratio Studiorum: Education in the Classical World in May 2011. Michael regularly teaches a core curriculum course on Greek and Roman literature and culture at Brooklyn College. There he has also taught courses such as Greek and Roman Mythology, The Self and Society, and Ancient Medicine: The Classical Roots of the Medical Humanities, a course completely of his own design. His teaching efforts at Brooklyn College have been recognized by an award for exceptional pedagogy. Michael has also taught courses at The City College of New York, including Elementary Latin and The Greek and Latin Roots of the English Language, and he is teaching an Intermediate Latin course focused on Vergil’s Aeneid at Hunter College in Spring 2015. Michael frequently attends pedagogical seminars in order to refine his teaching skills and to explore innovative ways of educating and engaging diverse groups of students. In recent semesters, he has successfully implemented Team-Based Learning (TBL) pedagogy in several courses after receiving training in this method from Brooklyn College’s TBL Academy in 2013. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Classics/Students#sthash.nlugoqxs.dpuf

Emily Fairey

Emily Fairey is the technical designer and editor of this site. She has a doctorate in Classics from CUNY Graduate Center (2006), and a masters in Library and Information Science from Pratt Institute (2011). She currently teaches Latin, Greek, and Classical Studies as an adjunct professor at Drew University, as well as creating websites, and language-learning modules. She is also a classically trained flutist and saxophonist and has played for 18 years in the Hungry March Band. For more information, see her website.